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Why did God choose the Jews?

  1. secularist10 profile image89
    secularist10posted 5 years ago

    For I am the LORD your God, The Holy One of Israel, your Savior; I gave Egypt for your ransom, Ethiopia and Seba in your place. Since you were precious in My sight, You have been honored, And I have loved you; Therefore I will give men for you, And people for your life. (Isaiah 43: 3-4)

    This is one passage among countless in the Old Testament indicating God's special relationship with the Jews/ Hebrews.

    However, despite the intensity of this divine love affair, nowhere is it ever explained exactly why God loves them so much, and chose them.

    Why? What is so special about them? Why not choose, say, the Koreans or the Incas or the Ostrogoths or the Somalis or some other ethnic group?

    1. pisean282311 profile image59
      pisean282311posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      good question...

      1. Paul Wingert profile image78
        Paul Wingertposted 10 months ago in reply to this

        Because it was the Jews who wrote it! Of course they're going to name themselves as the chosen ones! They chose one out of 33 Canaanite gods as their own "true god".

        1. Castlepaloma profile image22
          Castlepalomaposted 10 months ago in reply to this

          True, whose who wrote the OT history books, can be very bias.  Christain just use OT because they don't have a history.

          1. Paul Wingert profile image78
            Paul Wingertposted 10 months ago in reply to this

            Ancient cultures, Hebrews are no different, tend to think of themselves as the only civilized people on earth while all others are barbarians. Of course things haven't changes much since then because we have religious sects (Christian, Muslims, etc)  that think they're the "chosen" ones while everyone else is going to hell. But the Jews' view of being the "chosen" ones seriously deteriorated over the years. Mainstream Jews no longer view God as the great and powerful and seriously downgraded him after the Holocaust.

            1. Castlepaloma profile image22
              Castlepalomaposted 10 months ago in reply to this

              Each God says you have two choice's Up Or Down?

              Since Hell is the worst concept that anyone could imagine. All these religious groups kill for who has the right God.

              I just report the freak show , with a get out hell card, I will never use.

    2. aka-dj profile image79
      aka-djposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      God di not choose them out of many nations.
      He called Abram to serve Him, and said that He would , in essence, create a nation out of his descendants.
      Genesis 12;1  Now the LORD had said unto Abram, Get thee out of thy country, and from thy kindred, and from thy father's house, unto a land that I will shew thee: 2 And I will make of thee a great nation, and I will bless thee, and make thy name great; and thou shalt be a blessing: 3 And I will bless them that bless thee, and curse him that curseth thee: and in thee shall all families of the earth be blessed. 4 So Abram departed, as the LORD had spoken unto him; and Lot went with him:

      1. secularist10 profile image89
        secularist10posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        If true, then by choosing Abram/ Abraham he was choosing the Jews (his descendants) by default, so the question remains.

        And anyway, if making a nation out of Abram's descendants was a reward to Abram, that just raises another question: why did God choose to reward him in that way? He could have rewarded him in any number of other ways. It also raises yet another question: why didn't God make a nation out of other prophets or prominent men as a reward? Why did he reward only Abram with a nation?

        1. chasemillis profile image86
          chasemillisposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          No matter who is woulda coulda shoulda been, the same question would arise. The fact is that we live in a fallen world and we are to fight against the struggles of sin. It still is a good question, and I don't know if their actually is an answer hmm

          1. secularist10 profile image89
            secularist10posted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Christianity and Judaism claim that God can be understood. Yet he seems to do many things that cannot be understood, or that are frequently misunderstood.

      2. profile image0
        SirDentposted 5 years ago in reply to this



        I agree but would like to add a little to it.  God called all men.  Abram heard and listened to God's voice.  The Bible says that Abraham believed God and it was counted unto him as righteousness.

        Most do not believe God or even believe he is real.  It is the same today. 

        If you would read farther into Genesis, you will also notice how God called Isaac as being Abraham's only son.  Ishmael is not mentioned as being a son of Abraham by God.

        1. secularist10 profile image89
          secularist10posted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Ok, this is the most valuable response so far. Where is it written that God called all men?

          If God called all men, wouldn't there be some kind of record in other cultures/ societies of this calling?

          And anyway, as I asked Aka-DJ, why did God choose to "reward" Abram with a nation? Why not reward him in some other way?

          And why not reward some of the other prophets with their own nations, too? How come only Abram gets a nation?

          1. profile image0
            SirDentposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Would someone have a record of someone calling out to them if they did not hear the one calling?  2Pe 3:9  The Lord is not slack concerning his promise, as some men count slackness; but is longsuffering to us-ward, not willing that any should perish, but that all should come to repentance.

            He is still calling even today.   




            I have no idea why God did what He did.  He is the only one that can answer that question.  To my knowledge, nothing is written pertaining to why He did it that way except maybe in Ezekiel about the bloody baby. Chapter 16.  I will have to study it to make sure what it is about.



            I think even Ishmael was made into a great nation.  Of course I could be wrong.

            1. secularist10 profile image89
              secularist10posted 5 years ago in reply to this

              The citation you give doesn't really indicate that God called all men before/ during calling Abram, which is what I asked for. And it's from a book that was written long after Abram and the OT.

              There would be a good chance of there being a record of it. The Old Testament serves as a record of many dead polytheistic beliefs of the Near East. The New Testament records contemporary Roman practices.

              The record might also come in the form of beliefs and doctrines within large religious traditions. For example, Hinduism is a vast and complex religious tradition that was definitely around at the time of Abraham. It accommodates a variety of polytheistic, monotheistic and even atheistic tendencies. It would therefore be a fantastic opportunity for such a record.

              "I have no idea why God did what He did."

              That's pretty telling. Don't you find it a little odd? Creating a nation has a pretty big impact on the fate of the human race. And we're talking about creating human beings as a reward to another human being. Isn't that a little dehumanizing to the ones that serve as a "reward"? Doesn't it throw a monkey wrench into the whole concept of "free will" and individual salvation that Christians love so much?

              Surely God foresaw all the sinning and disobedience of the Israelites--and yet he expected them to be a "nation of priests" (or something to that effect), in the mold of their patriarch Abraham. How do you explain this? A nation of sinning priests?

              I think this issue carries much greater implications than you seem to believe.

              1. profile image0
                SirDentposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                Mal 3:6  For I am the LORD, I change not; therefore ye sons of Jacob are not consumed.   Old Testament verse.  God never changes.  He is the same today as He has always been.




                No belief system can outdate God.  Hinduism is one of man's many attempts of trying to understand God.  God cannot be understood.  No one can know Him, but what He has revealed to us, we can know.



                I don't have to know how everything works or why it works.  I know this computer works but I do not really know how it works. 

                Gen 17:5  Neither shall thy name any more be called Abram, but thy name shall be Abraham; for a father of many nations have I made thee.   Not just one nation, but many.

                Gen 18:18  Seeing that Abraham shall surely become a great and mighty nation, and all the nations of the earth shall be blessed in him?

                You speak of dehumanizing.  Israel was granted land by God Himself. It was given to Abraham.  Gen 12:7  And the LORD appeared unto Abram, and said, Unto thy seed will I give this land: and there builded he an altar unto the LORD, who appeared unto him.



                Exo 19:5  Now therefore, if ye will obey my voice indeed, and keep my covenant, then ye shall be a peculiar treasure unto me above all people: for all the earth is mine:
                Exo 19:6  And ye shall be unto me a kingdom of priests, and an holy nation. These are the words which thou shalt speak unto the children of Israel.


                Everything in the Old Testament points to one thing.  That s the coming of the Messiah.  God did forsee all the sinning and wickedness.  It is because of the sinful nature of man that Jesus Christ came to be born and to die.

                1. secularist10 profile image89
                  secularist10posted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  Again, I see no indication that God made an effort to call all men.

                  My point was that there would be a record of some kind in human cultures somewhere, at some time, regardless of whether anything "predates" God or not.

                  You don't have to know how the computer works, but you could if you wanted to. The computer operates according to certain basic physical laws. Those basic laws are 100% understood. The same cannot be said of the basic laws, decisions, motivations and idiosyncrasies of God.

                  Many nations from Abram--that just complicates things even more!

                  Israel granted land--Respectfully, so what? That doesn't change the "human reward" issue vis-a-vis Abraham.

                  Exodus 19:6 just reiterates what I just said--that God expected them to be a nation of priests. Yet it didn't turn out that way. It's easy to say in hindsight "it was all leading up to Jesus."

                  Jesus came to save all sinful men, all nations, not just the sinners of Israel. I'm talking about Israel here. But whatever, it's a minor point.

                  I could go on and on with these questions. The point is simply that there are many unresolvable issues here. But you've made a valiant effort smile

          2. profile image0
            Twenty One Daysposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            He was rewarded because (in spite of his own ideas, and those of others) he believed enough to stand out from the crowd; he accepted the "offer" to establish the Covenant. The reward for such a simple action of "yes, I'll do it" resulted in a massive reward --considering "back in the day" a man was valued by other men, based on how many children, wives and livestock he possessed.
            The result of a single mans' acceptance of this offer, resulted in a generational "blessing", still in effect today. In short, they are not "the chosen ones" but the result of one mans faith.

            Not to forget, before Abram (and even after) there was no such nation as the "Jews". The Jews came later as a single theology based on Mosaic "Pragmatic Ritualism". Israel came first, then the Jews.

            As it is said, "Not all who call themselves Israel are Israel".
            Meaning there was Israel (the faithful) and then there are the Jews (the religious).

            James.

            1. secularist10 profile image89
              secularist10posted 5 years ago in reply to this

              So then God lowered himself to play by human standards? And temporary standards, at that?

              1. profile image0
                Twenty One Daysposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                What "standards" are you remarking on?

                1. secularist10 profile image89
                  secularist10posted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  The standard of the time that you mentioned:

                  "a man was valued by other men, based on how many children, wives and livestock he possessed."

                  So God played to those standards and values that people held at that time.

                  1. profile image0
                    Twenty One Daysposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    As I said, valued by other men (humans). "God" was merely re-establishing unification between "He" and humanity. It just so happens this man Abram of a very well-to-do tribe of people accepted the offer to be the cornerstone of that reunification.

                    The reward was apparently massive for just that singular instance.
                    Which to some is a sign of the bounty that comes with simple faith.
                    In my own mind, experience, it was a prelude to the bounty of Abundant (Eternal) Life available to anyone who does the same --meaning acts on faith alone.

                    James.

    3. Dave Mathews profile image61
      Dave Mathewsposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Leave us not forget that it is the old testament Hebrews that God said he chose, BUT, Jesus re-wrote all of that with the new testament teaching that God loves everyone equally.

      1. secularist10 profile image89
        secularist10posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        That just brings up another question: why did God change his mind? And why at that particular time and place?

        And if God loved everyone equally, wouldn't it have been more effective to send that message, say, to China or the Native Americans, or another culture that did not have a tradition of monotheism in place?

        Also, perhaps more intriguingly, how can God change his mind? How can a perfect being contradict himself?

        1. profile image0
          Baileybearposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          the people that wrote the bible didn't know other parts of the world existed

          1. secularist10 profile image89
            secularist10posted 5 years ago in reply to this

            That's true, but presumably God could deliver a similar kind of message to those other peoples.

            Hmmm... He wasn't trapped on Mt. Sinai the whole time was he?

            1. kirstenblog profile image78
              kirstenblogposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              He is probably still trapped up there yikes

          2. pisean282311 profile image59
            pisean282311posted 5 years ago in reply to this

            @bailey exactly and that is why most religious books hardly cover more  regions...another confirmation that religion are man made...

      2. Mark Knowles profile image61
        Mark Knowlesposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        But - only if...................

      3. Beelzedad profile image59
        Beelzedadposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        You know, Dave, I think I would have a better appreciation and trust in your god if he had instead simply told us all from the get go to respect everyone equally until further respect is earned, rather than get us all poking out each others eye teeth, and then flip-flopping on it later.

        He didn't even come out and face us himself, but instead sent his son to do his bidding. Look what happened when the lynch mob got hold of him. smile

        1. Dave Mathews profile image61
          Dave Mathewsposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Beelzedad: Finely I can see your point on some things. This is refreshing to see for a change. I think when he gave his laws his commandments he specifically spells out how people should be toward him and each other, but as usual some just like to test things and see how far they can push the envelope. As for sending his son to do his bidding, I believe the son volunteered for the job.

          1. Beelzedad profile image59
            Beelzedadposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            That is why your god should have instead simply told us all to respect one another, end of story. That way, he would get the love and worship he deserved rather than making commandments for it.



            That's not how the bible puts it. He was sent as if he were a soldier on a mission carrying out an order. smile

            1. vector7 profile image61
              vector7posted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Careful there Beelzebub.. Those whose assume things they don't have knowledge of may may speak lies when their agenda is the guiding purpose..


              Matthew 26:53

              53 Thinkest thou that I cannot now pray to my Father, and he shall presently give me more than twelve legions of angels?

              Even though God's plan was to go through. Christ CHOSE to do it.

              He was on a mission. That He wanted accomplished as well.


              Luke 24:25-26

              25 Then he said unto them, O fools, and slow of heart to believe all that the prophets have spoken: 26 Ought not Christ to have suffered these things, and to enter into his glory?

              You see. Christ did what He done because He had a purpose to do so. For the glory of God, and to save the people who love God and seek God.


              John 17:1-4

              1 These words spake Jesus, and lifted up his eyes to heaven, and said, Father, the hour is come; glorify thy Son, that thy Son also may glorify thee: 2 As thou hast given him power over all flesh, that he should give eternal life to as many as thou hast given him. 3 And this is life eternal, that they might know thee the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom thou hast sent. 4 I have glorified thee on the earth: I have finished the work which thou gavest me to do.

              Wonderful how scripture clears things up so nicely huh?

              He always had a CHOICE. He LOVES us... And that's EXACTLY how the Bible puts it.

              smile

          2. profile image69
            paarsurreyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            That would be a suicide.

            1. Dave Mathews profile image61
              Dave Mathewsposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Suicide NO! Martyrdom Possibly? Blind obedience to a parent definitely yes. Just as Abraham did with his son.

              1. profile image0
                Brenda Durhamposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                That's a great point, Dave.  One that's often overlooked!

              2. profile image69
                paarsurreyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                Blind obedience is not praise-worthy; would one like to be blind?

                It cannot be called martyrdom.

                1. brotheryochanan profile image60
                  brotheryochananposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  It was the only way. There had to be a final sacrifice and not one of just animals. Its not suicide and its not blind obedience its not martyrdom, its necessity.

      4. AEvans profile image70
        AEvansposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I agree. smile

    4. Mikio profile image92
      Mikioposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Obviously, you take it for granted that the Jewish scripture is historical.  What if you question the assumption in the first place?  I'd say that the Jews wrote their own scriptures to understand their own particular history.  Good for them.  They 'think" that they have been chosen.  Sure.  Of course.  That's their right to 'think' that they have been chosen.  Neither you nor I need to get bent out of shape over what the ancient Jews thought of themselves as.  If you study different mythologies of the world, lots of other races have been chosen, too.  I don't take ancient myths as history.  Neither should you or anyone else.

      1. secularist10 profile image89
        secularist10posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Lol, did you see my name? I am a "secularist," I don't follow any religion. It's simply a question for discussion.

        Great point about other races being chosen.

    5. Ruben Rivera profile image81
      Ruben Riveraposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I think the bible is a great book but it was written by men to their own convenience, many would say God told them what to write, but in the end written by men interpreted is so many ways over the years, unfortunately in my own personal opinion not the last word.

      1. angelheart1 profile image60
        angelheart1posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I agree completely ,i was raised that all are eqial in the face of God?
        So I guess that when a story is told generations on to generations that a lot is bend to own convience .....I know there is faith ,and there are angels ,guerdian angels and message's to guide me because i am a psychic i cant denie there is more between heaven and earth but the bible or the Koran is written to control people and make them fear for God and his punishment ,its just a way to keep people down walking like sheeps in a group fear the strongest power there is ........we need to be openminded and free spirits ,everyone is special and we all deserve to be loved but then we have to start to love ourselfs and our life .....Blessed be angelheart1

    6. profile image0
      Brenda Durhamposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      We may never know!   It might be a good question for someone to ask God after they get to Heaven.

      My opinion is simply that He had to start somewhere.

      1. secularist10 profile image89
        secularist10posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Not the most satisfying answer, but honest anyway.

    7. profile image0
      Baileybearposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      does that make god racist?

      1. secularist10 profile image89
        secularist10posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        How can a perfect being be racist? smile

        1. vector7 profile image61
          vector7posted 5 years ago in reply to this

          I LOVE that statement..

          big_smile

          1. Druid Dude profile image59
            Druid Dudeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            God always goes where God is needed most. Evidently, the israelites were a wretched lot.

            1. secularist10 profile image89
              secularist10posted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Now, that's an interesting take. A kind of divine socialism, lol. A system of "grace redistribution." smile

              1. Druid Dude profile image59
                Druid Dudeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                Well, check it out. God told the israelites not to covet their neighbors property. They whined and theymoaned constantly. Some even wanted to return to Egypt. Forty years of that. Then they come to the river Jordan, saw the cool place that the Canaanites had...and wanted it. Moses said "Go get it, but, alas, I won't be going with." Then they went down, and took Canaan by force. Obviously, they hadn't changed much from the golden calf group at the site of the ten commandments. Kill no one. Would have been better to remain Nomads. Why? Because they were an ungrateful bunch, that's why. Why else do they wail at the wall?

                1. Druid Dude profile image59
                  Druid Dudeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  This is a test...this is only a test....this is a once per millenial test of the Global communications system. This test is performed once per 1000 years to determine if anyone has been paying attention. We will now return you to your regularly scheduled programming. Thank you.

    8. profile image69
      paarsurreyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      It is a misunderstanding of the scribes; every nation and people are equal to the Creato-God.

      1. secularist10 profile image89
        secularist10posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Seems like the scribes easily lend themselves to "misunderstanding," lol. How do you know your interpretation of the scribes is the correct one?

    9. Jesus was a hippy profile image60
      Jesus was a hippyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Maybe god doesnt exist and he didnt choose anyone. Maybe people living with the Jews decided they didnt like the jewish religion and decided to make up their own and as a result, they would have to be the chosen ones.

    10. Shahid Bukhari profile image60
      Shahid Bukhariposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I cannot say, for I am powerless to say ... Why God Created Adam, hence, Humans ... But I know,  Adam was Expelled from Paradise, for his Transgression ... That after a life of  "Repentance" ... he was readmitted into Paradise.

      Thats why, Humans, in following the Adamic, commit Sin ... But are mostly Allowed to Repent, for the Transgressions ...

      The Lord Hath Shown us The Way to Repent ... and after we Repent, we are Readmitted into The Ordained Abode for the Righteous among Adam's Progeny ... The Believing Humans ...

      Jews are a part, of humankind, and only God Knows, why He Chose them, to be His Chosen, among humans ...

      But they, as headstrong deniers, have always Transgressed His Sanction ... Most of them Never Repent ... nor make amends ... They,  keep on Transgressing The Ordained Limits ... And such are not the Attributes of the Repentants, or Believers.

      Ever since, the Jews, are First Exiled ... in The Warning, but due their persistence in Folly,  most of their Fallacious ones, stand Condemned, for eternity ...

      Because, the Jews, neither did, nor do they now, Repent, or Amend ... in their false Racial, now called, a national pride, manifest in their not Believing In God's placed Limitations on human Actions ... but Believing in their Race's Superiority over fellow humans !

      Pride, Is the Cause, of Satan, being Banished from The Divine Presence.
      For it is the Weak, who shall Inherit the Earth.

    11. DoubleScorpion profile image88
      DoubleScorpionposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Who's history is documented and remembered? The winners or the losers?

      In this case, who is considered the chosen? Those who wrote the bible (Hebrew in OT and Gentiles in NT) or those who read the bible after it was written.

    12. brotheryochanan profile image60
      brotheryochananposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      God started out with one nation. Today he starts out with one person.
      Do not think that the rest of the nations did not notice the Hebrews and they eventually learned that God was with the Hebrews. God picked the smallest race, not the biggest and most powerful, "because they were few in number" and in bondage. And God did what God does best, relieve them from their bondage and set them free from bondage and then He took them into a land that flowed with milk and honey and gave that land to Them for an inheritance in Him, inspite that others occupied it. As we will get the promised land after the resurrection that others will not get.
      Nebuchadnezzar, a Babylonian, recognized the God of the Hebrews, One pharaoh knew God through Joseph (coat of many colors)
      Way back in time there were descendants from Noah, Esau became the leader of the Edomites. Shem of the Arabians. There was only this little basin in the middle of our planet that God would show himself to all nations by this one insignificant nation, the Hebrews.
      Today He wants to show himself by each Christian or His nation.

    13. profile image0
      Deborah Sextonposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      ____________

      If I told you I would Be stoned. Some truths aren't suppose to written on a forum for all to see.

      A covenant is not a law or commandment.
      It is an agreement that both have to uphold or neither have to.
      If God was not pleased and wanted to end that covenant with Israel at any time he could have.

    14. debugs profile image72
      debugsposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Because God wanted to. God has personal preferences too and also because Araham , who was called 2the friend of God" was the FIRST Jew. There was no Jew or Judaism before Araham, thus, in a sense, God organized and "created" the Jewish people.

    15. Claire Evans profile image90
      Claire Evansposted 9 months ago in reply to this

      Contrary to popular belief, it was Moses who approached Yahweh and not the other way around.  Yahweh was a god to other people, the Kenites, before he became the god of the Israelites.


      The Kenite hypothesis attempts to explain the origin of the Yahwist religion.  It proposes that the Israelites learned of Yahweh through Moses who himself was acquainted with through his Kenite father-in-law Kenite father who was a Midianite priest.  When Moses fled Egypt to the wilderness, he joined the Kenites, a Midianite tribe of nomads living in the desert about Sinai.  Moses married into this tribe.  Their tribal deity was Yahweh, the Kenite god.   Moses therefore converted to their religion and became a devotee of Yahweh’s.  It was obligatory for a man to convert to the religion of his wife. 

      "The connection of Yahweh with Sinai, that we have already
      considered so fully, suggests that he was the God of the people who
      dwelt at Sinai. Apparently he was worshiped there long before the
      arrival of Israel. A priest of Midian was stationed there, according
      to Exod. 2 : 16 (J), and Exod. 3 : 1 (cf. 18:1,12 f.) (E). The god whom
      he served can only have been Yahweh, whom a unanimous and
      persistent tradition associates with Sinai. Horeb was already the
      " mountain of God," according to Exod. 3 : 1 (E), before Moses received
      there his revelation. In 3:12 (E) Yahweh says: "When thou hast
      brought forth the children of Israel out of Egypt, ye shall serve God
      upon this mountain." This implies that Horeb is a sanctuary where
      the worship of Yahweh is already established. In 19:10 (E) the
      people on arriving at Horeb sanctify themselves and wash their
      clothes, as men were accustomed to do when visiting a holy place.
      In 3 : 5 (J) Sinai is holy ground even before any revelation is made
      to Moses. In 3: 18 (J) the people ask that they may go three days'
      journey into the wilderness in order that they may sacrifice to Yahweh.
      In 19:4 (J) Yahweh says, when Israel arrives at Sinai: "I have
      brought you to myself." Such statements are inconsistent with the
      theory that Sinai first became a sanctuary of Yahweh in consequence
      of the revelation of Moses; they show that it was already a holy
      place in pre-Mosaic times. But, as we have seen, Israel did not
      worship Yahweh before the exodus, and there is no tradition con-
      necting it with Sinai before the time of Moses ; consequently, Yahweh
      must have been the God of the people inhabiting Mount Sinai before
      the arrival of Israel. "

      So Yahweh decided to become the leaders of the Israelites once Moses converted to Yahweh worship.   So, no, Yahweh was not exclusive to the Jews.  He was also a physical entity who participated in wars.

      https://archive.org/stream/jstor-314101 … 9_djvu.txt

  2. Paraglider profile image88
    Paragliderposted 5 years ago

    If you were a bloke with a notion to write a 'holy' book, would you write it for your own people or for some other people?
    Every religion is inclusive of its own and exclusive of others.

  3. knolyourself profile image61
    knolyourselfposted 5 years ago

    It's all about me.

  4. knolyourself profile image61
    knolyourselfposted 5 years ago

    "Why did God choose the Jews?" Because then they get to have it their own way.

    1. canadawest99 profile image60
      canadawest99posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Simple answer - he didn't.  Some superstitious men with big beards just got together and wrote that.

  5. profile image0
    just_curiousposted 5 years ago

    Whether chosen or not, history has proven it to be a dubious honor. They've suffered more, as a people, than any other group throughout history. Society's view of the TaNakH and the Bible caused them centuries of persecution by the Christians, attempted annihilation by Hitler and now hoped for annihilation by Islam.

    Whatever your take on the TaNakH or the Christian Bible I think they deserve respect for maintaining their identity  throughout the centuries of persecution. Whether chosen by any god or not, they're an amazing people. I would say if they were chosen it was as much as for their tenacity as anything else.

    1. secularist10 profile image89
      secularist10posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      They certainly have suffered, but not the most. There have been many groups that are no longer even in existence--victims of genocide or total conquest. So automatically those are worse-off.

      Unfortunately the Jews of Israel seem to be taking a cue from their former oppressors nowadays vis-a-vis the Palestinians. I think that's the real source of the animosity on the part of many Muslims.

      "I would say if they were chosen it was as much as for their tenacity as anything else."

      Sounds like a chicken-and-egg situation to me, lol.

      1. profile image0
        just_curiousposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Chicken and egg? Of course.

        I think if you review the history and rhetoric, the muslim hatred of the jews has much darker roots than the palestinian conflict. To say otherwise ignores obvious facts.

        I would be curious what example you might propose that would reflect the scale of persecution suffered by the jewish people. It would need to show evidence that it persisted over several millennium,    permeated society on multiple continents, crossed religious and social barriers, manifested itself in the literature of these societies, forced its children to hide their heritage in fear of the inquisition and ensured that they were kept in ghettos and poverty. And, of course, the example must include the fact that their nation is under constant threat from those who consider them not worthy of continued existence

        1. secularist10 profile image89
          secularist10posted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Oh, the Muslims certainly have a long history of hatred toward the Jews, just like the Christians. I didn't mean to deny that. I'm saying the stuff you see in the news today is principally influenced by Israel and Palestine.

          There are similar histories of hatred toward Christians and Hindus and others on the part of the Muslims, but the Jews have a "special" place in their heart nowadays. I don't think one can adequately explain that particular level of vitriol without Israel and its perceived injustices.

          Black Africans come pretty close to what you describe. As do the Gypsies within Europe. But every group of people and their history is unique. It's a macabre and bizarre exercise to try to say "this person with one eye and no legs is worse off than that person with no arms and half an ear."

          But my main point was that there are nations that are completely dead. That makes them automatically worse off than the Jews. Life always beats death, in my book.

          1. profile image0
            just_curiousposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Well, true. The Jewish people do still exist. And I would never deny the fact that many groups have been persecuted. I simply think one should call a spade a spade. And, to me, the Jewish people are the spade most persecuted.

            But I do know we all use different criteria and I certainly see your point. smile

  6. Ms Dee profile image86
    Ms Deeposted 5 years ago

    After what happened in Genesis 11, I think God put a longer-range plan into play. Man needed redemption, even after His previously wiping out all the evil with the flood and keeping only Noah, et al. Man still went wayward. So, he prepared to send his Son by raising up a nation. God's dealings with that nation was to demonstrate to the rest of the world why He needed to send His Son. Though that nation went wayward, as well, that nation also kept the traditions of Moses and the prophets, so that to this day we have the records of what God said through His prophets. What they said was basically the Israelites need redemption through a Savior, and many future events surrounding the coming of that Savior were foretold. It was all recorded. And now we can see how many of those prophecies have been fulfilled. His Son came. This was all to help man see it is of God's doing and why they needed the Son to come and die for them. There are prophecies yet to be fulfilled, too, in the end times. As these are fulfilled one by one, it is to demonstrate it is of God's doing. Again, we have a record of these prophecies because God had a nation to preserve them in a written record.

    1. secularist10 profile image89
      secularist10posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      But that is just stating the question in a different form: why did God choose to have the savior come out of the Jewish nation? Why not have him come out of, say, Mongolia or Nigeria or Hawaii?

      Presumably another nation would have gone "wayward" just as much as the Jews did, and would have kept traditions and doctrines just as much as the Jews did.

      1. Ms Dee profile image86
        Ms Deeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Yes, that's right. Other nations would have gone wayward, too. I see, so why God singled out one nation is not part of your question. As to why Abraham, he came out of the 'cradle of civilization'. Seems you are not taking into consideration the historical context back then. Why are you insisting there were civilization in the places you name back then for God to choose from? How do you know there were civilizations there at that point in time?

        1. Jesus was a hippy profile image60
          Jesus was a hippyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          All historic evidence suggests that humans first originated in africa so why dont they have the original scriptures from god? Why did god wait until they moved to Israel and Mecca?

          1. profile image0
            Twenty One Daysposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            The mDNA results suggests humans were first established in North Africa, yes. But that has nothing to do with "when" Abram was called. In fact, the text suggests highly it was Abram looking for Creator instead of Creator looking for him. Considering the righteous mentality, and Creator being of a righteous mentality, seeks out the same in humans constantly, came across Abram. His location was actually not far from where geneticists consider the "origination" to be.
            Ur (part of modern day Iraq/Kuwait) is believed to have contained one of the first baal temples, made of acacia and palm, just on the banks of the Euphrates --which begins way up north in Syria and right down to the gulf). given the need for water, and the lay of the land, a 1,600 kilometer "migration" across Saudi Arabia, is not impossible to consider. As for having "original scripts", perhaps they did, but given the various tribes, languages, disputes, etc, might have been lost, stolen or buried and forgotten.
            James.

            1. Jesus was a hippy profile image60
              Jesus was a hippyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Africans worship "Jah"

              Egyptians worshipped "Horus"

              Maybe god didnt choose who to bless. Maybe each country created their own god and therefore, whichever country you look at, was chosen by their particular god.

              1. profile image0
                Twenty One Daysposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                Egyptians did not exist at the time of Abram.
                But what I do find funny in their mythology is how Isis collected her dismembered hubbies body parts --less his procreating member-- and was able to fashion Horus. Hmm, them `gyptians are miracle workers -- jeje.


                I believe --and stand corrected if inaccurate, the people of Ur worshiped the Sumerian icon Nanaa (spelling?) and believed their origin was Erik. Their language suggests an African tribal dialect.

                I am not at all aware of claims by any of the tribes as to having been "chosen", which means Abram did not consider himself "chosen" but blessed to have been chosen from among many --especially the many varieties of deities, tribal rituals, etc he was engulfed in.

                Either way, history is a very interesting thing.

                James

                1. Jesus was a hippy profile image60
                  Jesus was a hippyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  I agree history is very interesting and religion is a very big part of history. I like the egyptians beliefs they are quite amusing although they are no more far fetched than any other beliefs I have encountered.

            2. brotheryochanan profile image60
              brotheryochananposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              and at one time all the continents were connected

          2. Ms Dee profile image86
            Ms Deeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Back to the original question: "Why not choose, say, the Koreans or the Incas or the Ostrogoths or the Somalis or some other ethnic group?"

            Back in Noah's day, God "saw that man's wickedness was widespread on the earth" (Gen 6) and found Noah was a righteous man. So he and his family were saved out of the flood that wiped out everything else that was wicked. When mankind began to turn away from him again, God didn't want to wipe them out again with a flood, so confused their language (Gen 11) and called one of Noah's descendants via his eldest son to move to a different land (Gen 12). Why via Noah's eldest and why Abram who in the lineage came from the line of the eldest descendants? How about, first come is first served smile

            1. Jesus was a hippy profile image60
              Jesus was a hippyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              You actually pointed out some problems there. God confused the languages yet he also claims not to confuse anything at another part of the bible.

              I believe the exact wording in the bible was that noah found grace in the eyes of the lord.

              Does that mean god changed his mind after noah spoke to him and decided to let him live? Doesnt god already know everything then?

              Why would an all powerful all LOVING god deliberatley drown millions of people including children and babies?

              Couldnt he just magically make them all nice people? Didnt he create them in HIS image? Isnt god nice?

              So many questions so many questions.

              1. Ms Dee profile image86
                Ms Deeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                These are certainly fair questions. One of my children had a lot of questions like these. In my effort to try and offer a fair response I went on a search and found this book: "God of the Possible: Does God Ever Change His Mind?" by Gregory A. Boyd. Have you heard of the Open View of God? It challenges some of the traditional theological positions. It provides a view helpful for such questions as, 'Why does God create certain people to only then send them to hell?' And, 'Does God foreknow the outcome of every decision we will ever make?' I'm not on commission or anything for promoting this book, but mentioning it because we found it very helpful for our many questions.

                1. Jesus was a hippy profile image60
                  Jesus was a hippyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  Although I havent read the book and I dont often read due to lack of time (always working or debating) I am fairly sure (although I could be wrong) that it wont contain anything ne that I havent been presented with over the last few years of debating theists of different religions.

                  If there is amything in particular you'd like me to address I'll always give it a look over and try to present a logical response but to keep it simple, try to think, could I have done that better if I was god?

                  Would you drown children and babies if you could simply think the universe back out of existance and create a fresh? Did they need to suffer? If you could create people exaclty as you want, then wouldnt you create good people and not people that want to "sin"?

                  1. Ms Dee profile image86
                    Ms Deeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    What about the thought that God doesn't know how all the future will turn out? BTW, it is a really easy read and only about 150 pp. The short answer to your last questions here is, yes, they needed to be removed in order to attempt a removal of evil. He did create man exactly as he wanted and that included mankind with a choice things. I must admit, though, someone who puts time into debating and not studying up on the issues is not a very good debater, in the end. I would encourage you to prioritize some time for real study on the issues, too.

                2. Beelzedad profile image59
                  Beelzedadposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  Unfortunately, Boyd winds up not explaining himself very well at all as he circumnavigates the biblical claim that god is omniscient:

                  "1 John 3:20: "For God is greater than our hearts, and he knows everything" (NIV); 1 Samuel 15:29: "He who is the Glory of Israel does not lie or change his mind; for he is not a man, that he should change his mind" (NIV); and Isaiah 46:9-10, "I am God, and there is no other; I am God, and there is none like Me. I make known the end from the beginning, from ancient times, what is still to come" (NIV). In Isaiah 41:22-23, Yahweh, by revealing what idols cannot do, indicates what he can
                  do: "Let them bring forth and declare to us what is going to take place; as for the former events, declare what they were, that we may consider them, and know their outcome; or announce to us what is coming. Declare the things that are going to come afterward, that we may know that you are gods .... Behold, you are of no account, and your work amounts to nothing ...." (NASB). Another passage would be Ephesians 2:lO: "For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them" (NASB)."


                  Boyd's argument is thus:

                  "If God does not foreknow future free actions, it is not because his knowledge of the future is in any sense incomplete. It's because there is, in this view, nothing dejnite there for God to know!" According to Boyd, "free actions do not exist to be known until free agents create them."

                  smile

                  1. brotheryochanan profile image60
                    brotheryochananposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    This is what i love about the things of God.
                    There is always something new and exciting.

                    Free actions do not exist to be known until free agents create them.
                    wonderful.
                    I will be pondering this.

        2. secularist10 profile image89
          secularist10posted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Ms Dee:

          No, I did ask why God singled out, or "chose," that particular nation. You said to have Jesus come from them. So that just begs the question--why did he choose to have Jesus come from them.

          "Seems you are not taking into consideration the historical context back then. Why are you insisting there were civilization in the places you name back then for God to choose from?"

          Well, Chinese civilization goes back to at least 2000 BC, so right around that time. There were settlements all over Africa by this time. The Indus Valley civilization occurred around 3000 BC or earlier, putting it right around the time of Abraham and the start of Jewish culture.

          There were cultures all over the Mediterranean, Anatolia and Persia by this time. "Civilization" arose independently in several places around the globe. But even more interestingly, there were a plethora of other cultures and groups in the very region that the Jews came from.

          But this is all beside the main point of Jesus. Since Jesus came around in year zero, God theoretically could have put him in any culture on the globe of that time. He did not need 2000 to 3000 preceding years just to send Jesus. Around the time of Jesus, there were even more places God could have chosen from. So why that particular group? And if it's all about Jesus, why not send him earlier on, to save even more people?

          1. Ms Dee profile image86
            Ms Deeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            These are all fair questions. It is sounding like you have a very questioning mind and once some answers are proposed to your initial question, this begs more questions. Have you done a lot of biblical and ancient history study to get a really good grasp of the background history of that time? I find a REALLY good grasp of the actual context helps immensely with the many questions that can come about all this.

            1. Ms Dee profile image86
              Ms Deeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              To offer my two cents worth of further thoughts, though, is that God wanted to start a new nation in Canaan, not China or elsewhere. Included in that was to replace the idol worshipers currently in Canaan at that time with a new nation who worshiped him. He also wanted someone from Noah's lineage to send there. I think he may have tried to send Abram's father, but he only got as far as Haran.

              1. Ms Dee profile image86
                Ms Deeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                I could suggest also that this all has to do with, at least in part, with God's war with evil. IMHO, God is choosing his battles, as we see throughout the scriptures. I have read another of Gregory A. Boyd's books that we found helpful along this line -- again, I do not get any commission for this, or anything. It is, "Satan and the Problem with Evil". A good grasp of Satan's role in the world is a must for understanding God's work and purposes in the world. A warfare worldview of scripture lends huge insight into how to view God. This book, too, challenges some of the classical Calvinist interpretations, which do not provide adequate answers.

                1. Jesus was a hippy profile image60
                  Jesus was a hippyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  Why is god battling with evil when he created it?

                  Isaiah 45:7 I the lord created evil

                  Surely he could have done without creating evil and then there would be no need for him to battle with it?

                  Satan couldnt possibly be evil if god hadnt created evil. Evil would be non existant.

                  1. Ms Dee profile image86
                    Ms Deeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    WHy do you think God created evil when the Is 45:7 actually means 'I form light and create darkness'? Some good studies on the word 'darkness' here in this context say it implies this darkness he creates is done so by withdrawing some of the light. Light cannot dwell in darkness. When the created chooses darkness, light naturally withdraws from it. It is erroneous to believe God creates evil.

              2. secularist10 profile image89
                secularist10posted 5 years ago in reply to this

                Well, yes, I've always been a questioner and a critic of all ideas. That is why I'm not religious. I doubt that I would ever be able to order my life around ideas and concepts that are so full of shortcomings.

                Sure, I've studied the Bible and various Christian thinkers and philosophers. But I don't think one needs a PhD in theology to make sense of these issues, because (1) most of the people who reach that level of education still don't agree on all this stuff, and (2) more importantly, the Bible and the whole message of God is supposed to be accessible and intelligible to all people.

                The "context" of the Bible is often cited, but the only true context was an ancient world full of barbaric, savage practices and beliefs.

                Hate to be politically incorrect, but I simply don't give the benefit of the doubt to ideas and beliefs formed in a world where women were valued as little more than vessels for offspring, where women were the property of their father or husband, where draconian physical punishments were the rule and not the exception, where no knowledge of science or anything resembling it existed, and where psychotic xenophobic tribalism underlay government and society. What an awful and disturbing world they lived in. I prefer to not have any part of it.

                As far as Canaan, again, this is simply the same question in a different form--why did God choose Canaan to start a nation instead of China? There were plenty of idol worshippers in China, southeast Asia and India/ Pakistan at the time. What was so special about Canaan?

                The real question, at bottom, is what is God really doing here. What is his real game.

                I think the various Christians on this forum, who have given it a good try, nevertheless have not solved this fundamental problem.

                1. Disappearinghead profile image88
                  Disappearingheadposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  What is God really doing here? Mmmmm

                  As I understand it He desires to have a relationship with humanity. He chose Abram to after it all went pear shaped with Adam's descendants and subsequently Noah's descendants. Why Abram? Who knows. Perhaps he was more receptive to God that his contemporaries. God obviously saw something in him and later on said that Israel would be a nation of priests charged with bringing humanity to God.

                  1. secularist10 profile image89
                    secularist10posted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    "Why Abram? Who knows. Perhaps he was more receptive to God that his contemporaries."

                    Perhaps. Or perhaps God simply chose him arbitrarily. I find it very hard to believe that there would not have been at least ONE other human being SOMEWHERE in the entire world of hundreds of thousands of the time that would have been receptive to God's message. Assuming, that is, that God made an effort to communicate with other people... which we don't know, evidently.

                    Zoroastrianism was a major religion in Persia at the time, and it featured an early form of monotheism, for example. There's at least several thousand good contenders right there.

  7. dutchman1951 profile image60
    dutchman1951posted 5 years ago

    He choose them because he could not find 3 wise men and a virgin in Rome!

  8. mitsybella profile image60
    mitsybellaposted 5 years ago

    He is so cute

  9. knolyourself profile image61
    knolyourselfposted 5 years ago

    "If you could create people exaclty as you want, then wouldn't you create good people and not people that want to "sin"?"
    Assuming God created people, he did create 'good-born-people'. It is people that change them into bad through the facilities of the mind.

    1. Jesus was a hippy profile image60
      Jesus was a hippyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Thats a pretty bare assertion dont you think? Are you saying that convicted murderers were born good and taught to be evil murderers? By who? their parents?

      Prove that anyone was created. Your making some pretty bold claims there and I'd like to see some evidence.

  10. profile image0
    Twenty One Daysposted 5 years ago

    From what the lineage shows, Abram was not the "first" to be called, although I am not certain if Terah was nor Nahor & Haran. But, considering all three assisted Abram in his departure "down stream" through Turkey with all his flocks, etc, it would seem likely they knew of this calling to some degree...

    What I find very interesting is the lineage and the length of time until Issac was born. As it was from Nahor that Laban and eventually Rebekah, Issac's wife came, who would be the mother of Jacob (Israel).

    James.

  11. profile image61
    salvieposted 5 years ago

    hehehe,, thats imposible ,,god never change his mind,, if he can change i would wish to him that  to chang the character of people in this world,, stop all the gumblers,,and  any bad things ,,

    1. Druid Dude profile image59
      Druid Dudeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      All aspects of the image. Hearkens to the Israelites wanderin' in the widerness.

  12. profile image61
    salvieposted 5 years ago

    knolyyourself,,,i agree with you that,,,

  13. Hokey profile image61
    Hokeyposted 5 years ago

    Its all crap....................goodbye...............

  14. profile image69
    paarsurreyposted 5 years ago

    Why did God choose the Jews?

    All nations are equal in the eyes of the Creator-God.

  15. No one knows profile image61
    No one knowsposted 5 years ago

    God chose the Jews because the Jews wrote the Bible. If the Incas had written the Bible, chances are they would have written that the Incas are the chosen. Their Bible probably wouldn't have much to say about the Jews at all.

    1. earnestshub profile image88
      earnestshubposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I love the profile pic! smile (No gods were damaged in this post.) smile

  16. profile image69
    paarsurreyposted 5 years ago

    Why did God choose the Jews?

    All nations are equal in the eyes of the Creator-God.
    God chose Krishna and Zoroaster as he did choose Moses from his people.

  17. ceciliabeltran profile image85
    ceciliabeltranposted 5 years ago

    It only traces the evolution of the Jewish people and their theo-centric culture. Must we take everything literally? When G-d chooses you in ancient literature, it only means that has become your destiny. When G-d commands you, it only means that is your nature.

    G-d in this context is all the forces coming together to form "a people" when they were formerly slaves. It is their adherence to their faith that chose their destiny and liberation.

    It is an amazing story and an inspiring one. Don't dumb it down folks.

    1. secularist10 profile image89
      secularist10posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Not according to the religions in question.

      1. ceciliabeltran profile image85
        ceciliabeltranposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        hmm...please have a macroscopic understanding of world mythology so that you don't have to battle ignorance. Instead, you will see why that's happening and no longer participate in the ignorance.

        1. secularist10 profile image89
          secularist10posted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Please realize that the question is not about world mythology, it's about the specific beliefs of these specific religions.

          Any similarities or connections to other world myths and beliefs is another discussion altogether.

          1. ceciliabeltran profile image85
            ceciliabeltranposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            that is my point, it is not a different topic altogether.  The question Why did G-d choose the Jews is based on Jewish Literature, is it not? The problem of that question is it is belaboring a metaphor as though it were a historical event.

            It is a story. You cannot possibly confirm that G-d infact chooses in any way. You cannot even confirm if there is a G-d. It is not factual. It is symbolic. They have significance that counter to what most people believe are understood by the learned rabbis. It is only the wishy-washy types and the christians who are equally wishy-washy who take it literally because they really couldn't give a real rat's ass what it really means. They just want their bake-off and christmas charities and mouthing off things they heard when they were three.

            I already told you what it means. It is nothing to be hurt about. It means something happened that fated them to be the Jewish people. That is what is meant. Their identity is tied to G-d and that is what is being celebrated. Now continuing to color in ways that only angers others is already war-mongering.

            1. secularist10 profile image89
              secularist10posted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Well, you can call them wishy-washy, and while I may very well agree, that is their religion. It's wishy-washy, it's about sin, it's about Noah's ark, it's about the slavery in Egypt, it's about the resurrection, it's about hell, it's about this and it's about that. That's just what it is.

              Now, we can certainly take a step back objectively and see COUNTLESS similarities with many other religions, superstitions and belief systems all over the world.

              Of course I agree it's a story. Of course I agree you cannot possibly confirm any such thing about God, and certainly not that God exists. But that is my belief, as a "secularist," relevant outside this discussion. For the purpose of this discussion, I'm assuming some basic things, and seeing where the logic takes us.

              I certainly do not agree, however, that it is meant to be symbolic. It certainly wasn't for the ancient Jews who wrote these words. Perhaps to some such as yourself, or others who study at the Joseph Campbell School of Theology, but as far as the real believing Christians and Jews are concerned, it's real, my friend. It's very real... smile

              And BTW, I don't see much war-mongering. I actually think the discussion has been pretty civil.

              1. livelonger profile image88
                livelongerposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                The resurrection and hell? Are you aware that Judaism has no beliefs about Jesus whatsoever, much less his supposed resurrection, and hell does not exist in Judaism?

                As to the "countless" similarities to other religions, I think you mean Christianity which adopted plenty of Mediterranean pagan beliefs as a kind of fusion belief system. But Judaism adopted several beliefs from host cultures, including the "book of the dead" talked about during the Days of Awe, which was a Babylonian-like belief.

                Furthermore, there is very little historical record of Jews being slaves in Egypt; if anything, evidence points to a small group of slaves that escaped Egypt just joined the Israelite nation.

                There is no evidence whatsoever for an Adam and Eve, Garden of Eden, or Noah's Ark. These are all metaphoric, and with powerful symbolic meaning.

                For fundamentalist Christians and Jews, these are all historical fact. But why are you so insistent on using their perspective? Are fundamentalist beliefs the only ones worth respecting?

                1. secularist10 profile image89
                  secularist10posted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  Obviously I was referring to Christianity. Should have made that more clear.

                  Both Judaism and Christianity have countless similarities with other world belief systems. It's pretty well-established by now that Zoroastrianism was an important influence on Judaism, as were contemporary beliefs in the eastern Mediterranean, as you mentioned.

                  What we know today as "fundamentalism" was simply the entire religion (both Christianity and Judaism) for almost all of their history, until the last few centuries when new insights into the age of the world and the evolution of people have arisen. And there are still many holdouts. And many that are not considered to be "fundamentalist."

                  Literalism still lies at the heart of Judaism and Christianity, and all religions. Perhaps not total, 100% literalism, but I would submit that most Christians literally believe that Jesus was born to a virgin and resurrected from the dead, for example. And most Jews literally believe that God etched out the 10 commandments, a la Charlton Heston. Moreover, most Jews certainly believe that "thou shalt not kill" is not a metaphorical statement, but a literal one.

                  Any religion makes literal claims about the world. So it's not unjustified to employ a literalist approach to understand it. The perspective you are advocating is not a primary or widely-held one, among either practicing Jews or Christians.

                  1. profile image69
                    paarsurreyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    It is the context of a verse from the Word Revealed that would decide whether it is to be taken litreal or smybolic.

                    [6] And shewing mercy unto thousands to them that love me, and keep my commandments. [7] Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain: for the Lord will not hold him guiltless that shall take the name of the Lord his God in vain. [8] Remember that thou keep holy the sabbath day. [9] Six days shalt thou labour, and shalt do all thy works. [10] But on the seventh day is the sabbath of the Lord thy God: thou shalt do no work on it, thou nor thy son, nor thy daughter, nor thy manservant, nor thy maidservant, nor thy beast, nor the stranger that is within thy gates.
                    [11] For in six days the Lord made heaven and earth, and the sea, and all things that are in them, and rested on the seventh day: therefore the Lord blessed the seventh day, and sanctified it. [12] Honour thy father and thy mother, that thou mayest be longlived upon the land which the Lord thy God will give thee.

                    [13] Thou shalt not kill.

                    [14] Thou shalt not commit adultery. [15] Thou shalt not steal.
                    [16] Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbour. [17] Thou shalt not covet thy neighbour's house: neither shalt thou desire his wife, nor his servant, nor his handmaid, nor his ox, nor his ass, nor any thing that is his. [18] And all the people saw the voices and the flames, and the sound of the trumpet, and the mount smoking: and being terrified and struck with fear, they stood afar off, [19] Saying to Moses: Speak thou to us, and we will hear: let not the Lord speak to us, lest we die. [20] And Moses said to the people: Fear not: for God is come to prove you, and that the dread of him might be in you, and you should not sin.

                    Book Of Exodus   Chapter 20

                    Bible mentions that human beings are not to be killed, literally.

                    Yet a lot of killing has been made in the Jewish and Christian history.

                  2. livelonger profile image88
                    livelongerposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    I'd be interested why you're so confident that most Jews or Christians believe that scripture describes the literal truth. This survey seems to suggest a third of Christians do:
                    http://www.gallup.com/poll/27682/OneThi … -True.aspx

                    Among Jews, it is even lower, since fundamentalists comprise a far lower percentage among all Jews, and Judaism is explicitly open to a wide range of beliefs, even among those who consider themselves "ultra-Orthodox."

                    Your choice of the "thou shalt not kill" is a curious one, considering this is one "commandment" which just about everyone can agree on, regardless of their faith or lack of faith. I wonder why you wouldn't consider one of the other 613 commandments traditional Jews consider obligatory to follow, and how many Jews think things like avoiding fabrics of mixed fibers is one commanded by God. I suspect because your perception of Jews is colored by your familiarity with Christianity, and Christians' (often very wrong) views of Jewish practices and beliefs.

                    I suspect  you also are eager to defend your own secular viewpoint, and that's all the more easy when you paint all religious people as a bunch of fundamentalist loons who read all scripture literally. (I often see the same among religious fundamentalists who paint all atheists as nihilists.)

  18. profile image69
    paarsurreyposted 5 years ago

    All nations are equal in the eyes of the Creator-God.
    God chose Krishna and Zoroaster as he did choose Moses from his people.

    1. profile image69
      paarsurreyposted 5 years ago in reply to this
  19. flpalermo profile image26
    flpalermoposted 5 years ago

    What makes you think God chose "The Jews"?
    Abraham was not a Jew. (Genesis 14:13) Isaac was not a Jew. Jacob was not a Jew. (they were Hebrews)
    Moses was not a Jew. (He was a Levite Exodus 4:14)
    Aaron was not a Jew. (He was a Levite Exodus 4:14)
    ALL the Priests God chose were not Jews. (They were Levites- Numbers 1:50)
    The Jews did not come into existence until Judah was born to Leah (Gen 29:35)
    Before Judah was born, God had already made the Promises to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob;  never to Leahs son, Judah.
    None of the Priests of Israel were Jews. (Heb 7:14)
    Joseph, son of Israel was not a Jew. (He was a Hebrew-Gen 39:17)
    The Apostle Paul was not a Jew, (He was a Hebrew from the tribe of Benjamin- Phillipians 3:5)
    If you are Christs' (according to Romans 8:9) then are you Abrahams' seed and HEIRS according to the Promise (Galatians 3:29). As a Christian, you will inherit whatever Abraham inherits.
    Whatever Abraham was promised is to be the inheritance of all Christians. Was Abraham promised Heaven?
    Lets see:
    (Gen. 12:2-3,6-7) ...go into a land that I will show you...I will make of you a great nation....Abraham departed...they went forth into the land of Caanaan...Unto your seed will I give this land...the land of Caanaan.
    (Genesis 13:15) For  all the land which you see to you will I give it, and to your seed forever.
    The land of Caanaan, much of which is occupied by the Jews today, was promised to Abraham and his descendants. THATS WHY IT'S CALLED "THE PROMISED LAND"!
    Notice that it is a region on this earth, not up in Heaven somewhere!
    Was this promise expanded until it ultimately included the whole earth? See Romans 4:13: 
    For the promise that he should be the heir of THE WORLD, was not to Abraham, or to his seed (Christians) through the Law, but throuh the righteousness of faith.
    NOT ONE WORD ABOUT HEAVEN! Christians are to inherit the earth, together with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, and all the prophets of God, FOREVER.
    This promise is to ALL people of the earth, not just the Jews. In Christ, all men will come to the knowledge of the truth, and have an opportunity to inherit, with the father of the Faithful- Abraham!

    1. secularist10 profile image89
      secularist10posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Jews and Hebrews are the same. I indicated as much in the opening question.

    2. Eaglekiwi profile image73
      Eaglekiwiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Great reading.
      Really enjoyed your informative post!

  20. Mercredi profile image63
    Mercrediposted 5 years ago

    Oh, that's all based on a misuderstanding. Sometime soon some scrolls will be found in a cave in the Middle East and it'll finally be realized that what He meant is that the Pygmies are his real chosen people.

  21. waynet profile image48
    waynetposted 5 years ago

    Because he thought that them little round hats they wear would hide their bald spots...He always thinks ahead does God. let us praise him!

    1. earnestshub profile image88
      earnestshubposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I wondered what all the hats were for, that makes sense. I thought it was to hide the tin foil. smile

      1. waynet profile image48
        waynetposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Ah yes and the tin foil as well! big_smile

  22. profile image69
    paarsurreyposted 5 years ago

    Why did God choose the Jews?

    That does not mean that others were not chosen by the Creator-God for His Converse.

    The Creator-God chose from every people and honored them with His Message.

    Jews were no exception.

    1. profile image69
      paarsurreyposted 5 years ago in reply to this
  23. vector7 profile image61
    vector7posted 5 years ago

    Here is a question. Why does it matter?

    If God is GOD wouldn't His choice be trustworthy?

    And likely to have very good reasons I'm sure..

    And there is no way to actually find out. No one knows. Never will on earth.


    But just for kicks I'll give you an answer that is absolutely correct..

    "God works in mysterious ways."


    smile

    1. profile image69
      paarsurreyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      And that is how the Creator-God Allah YHWH saved Jesus a cursed death on the Cross as inteded by the Jews. Jesus escaped against all odds and immigrated to India, secretly.

      The Creator-"God works in mysterious ways" sometimes, as per His wisdom.

      1. vector7 profile image61
        vector7posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        That has nothing to do with the subject of this thread paar..

        smile

        1. profile image69
          paarsurreyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          The Jews were chosen by the Creator-God for accepting the prophets messengers; not to deny them. The Jews wanted to kill Jesus on the Cross to prove him a false prophet; they failed and hence it is true that the Creator-"God works in mysterious ways" as per His wisdom.

          The Jews defied the original Covenant for which they were chosen by the Creator-God; their merit for being chosen was lost.

          1. Greek One profile image78
            Greek Oneposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            ... and thus, with a single forum post.. Paar voided the Bible.

            1. vector7 profile image61
              vector7posted 5 years ago in reply to this

              lol

          2. profile image69
            paarsurreyposted 5 years ago in reply to this
  24. Misha profile image75
    Mishaposted 5 years ago

    Jewsus...

  25. Eaglekiwi profile image73
    Eaglekiwiposted 5 years ago

    ..Because HE Could...

  26. Tony L Smith profile image65
    Tony L Smithposted 5 years ago

    Kinda a roof question. Sorta like opening a book in the middle and asking a question about a statement there.
    Treasure doesn't just float to the surface, you gotta dig.
    It is evident that God didn't choose the Jews because they were such a Holy people, He held onto the bloodlines because of another reason.

  27. optimus grimlock profile image60
    optimus grimlockposted 5 years ago

    because they used a flawd bracket system where the jews beat the irish because they gave them a mountain of patatoes smile

  28. profile image61
    Arcjahadposted 5 years ago

    Look the Jews that we see today are not the biblical Jews the ones I live around are white and true Hebrews were a semetic people looking more Arab or ethiopian so the ones that suffer today are false Jews who took on the role of the so called chosen people and they suffer hatred because of usury and greed and that superiority mindset . The true chosen people of Yahuwah are the people that truly believe in him and his son Yahushua and that call upon his true name not his titles

    1. profile image69
      paarsurreyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      A good point

  29. profile image69
    paarsurreyposted 5 years ago

    Jesus or Yahushua was not a son of god;as Mary was not wife of the Christian-god-the-father.

    Was she?

  30. brotheryochanan profile image60
    brotheryochananposted 5 years ago

    Deuteronomy 7:6   For thou art an holy people unto the LORD thy God: the LORD thy God hath chosen thee to be a special people unto himself, above all people that are upon the face of the earth.

      Deuteronomy 7:7   The LORD did not set his love upon you, nor choose you, because ye were more in number than any people; for ye were the fewest of all people:

      Deuteronomy 7:8   But because the LORD loved you, and because he would keep the oath which he had sworn unto your fathers, hath the LORD brought you out with a mighty hand, and redeemed you out of the house of bondmen, from the hand of Pharaoh king of Egypt.

      Deuteronomy 7:9   Know therefore that the LORD thy God, he is God, the faithful God, which keeps covenant and mercy with them that love him and keep his commandments to a thousand generations;

      Deuteronomy 7:10   And repays them that hate him to their face, to destroy them: he will not be slack to him that hates him, he will repay him to his face.

  31. knolyourself profile image61
    knolyourselfposted 5 years ago

    " For thou art an holy people unto the LORD thy God: the LORD thy God hath chosen thee to be a special people unto himself, above all people that are upon the face of the earth."
    Thinking maybe this be posted in the 'why people don't like religion' thread.

  32. darrylcrawford profile image44
    darrylcrawfordposted 5 years ago

    Abraham was Jewish and because of his faithfulness to God in Genesis, HE chose him. 
    http://s2.hubimg.com/u/4475325_f248.jpg

  33. profile image0
    Digsposted 5 years ago

    God honored the faith of Abraham.  For apart from faith , it is impossible to please God.

    1. livelonger profile image88
      livelongerposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Not true.

      From the time of Moses onward, Judaism has been a religion of deeds, not faith. There is not a single mitzvah that commands faith. The Covenant does not demand faith in G-d, but rather to walk with G-d. There is a difference.

      1. wavegirl22 profile image47
        wavegirl22posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        finally the sound of reason!

      2. profile image0
        Digsposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        God blesses obediance for sure, however God blessed Abraham and entered into a covenant with him and his descendants (the Jewish people), for his (Abraham's), belief--not deeds--counting it to him as righteousness (Genesis 15: 6).  In the Hebrew language the word belief (aman), means faithfulness and trustworthiness.  Moses was not the father of the Jewish people.  God blessed Abraham with Isaac, the son of promise based on Abraham's faithfulness (believing what God said to him), not Ishmael, son of his flesh.  Not all of Abraham's descendants are Jewish.  I am not minimizing the importance of obediance, but it is impossible to please God apart from faith.  Obediance is an act of faith.

        1. livelonger profile image88
          livelongerposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Yes, that is the classical Christian understanding, understandable because Christianity is a dogmatic faith. It is not the Jewish understanding. To Jews, faith is meaningless until you put belief and words into action.

          Abraham's covenant required ten deeds, not simply a faith. And his covenant said his descendants would be numerous, they would get a land, and they would be delivered from their slavemasters.

          The covenant with Moses made Jews a nation of priests (Ex 19:5-6), and is completely based on actions (mitzvot), not on any required beliefs. This is why Judaism accepts converts - something missing in your telling of who is a Jew - because anyone can enter the Covenant by agreeing to perform the mitzvot. Halakha does not require you to ask a potential convert what his/her beliefs are.

          As for Ishmael: G-d blessed him and his descendants, too (Gen 17:20).

          1. profile image0
            Digsposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            I hear what you are saying, but the point I am striving to make is why perform any deeds for a God in whom you have no faith?  Deeds are meaningless unless performed as an act of faith.  Deeds without underlying faith (belief) in God are pointless acts!  Right about Ishmael, but the original question was why God chose the Jews?  Answer--because of the belief (faith), of Abraham, not because of Moses who came long after God's covenant with Abraham and his seed (the Jewish people).  Without the Abrahamic Covenant there would not have been a Mosaic Covenant.
            Abraham's deeds were performed in faith believing that what God had spoken to him was true and would come to pass.  Abraham obeyed God and acted to sacrifice Isaac, because he believed.  He did not act to perform a deed ordered by a God in whom he had no faith. 

            In Deuteronomy 32:20, Moses recounts God's wrath against a "perverse generation--unfaithful children."   In Numbers 12:7, God says of Moses,"he is faithful in all my household.  I speak with him directly, openly, and not in riddles; he sees the form of the Lord."  Old Testament Accounts of God responding directly to the faith of believers are to numerous to encapsulate here.
            I am not Jewish, but I know the same God known by Abraham and Moses.

            1. livelonger profile image88
              livelongerposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              I understand, and for a lot (most?) Jews, belief in G-d is what motivates them to perform the mitzvot. For Abraham, that was certainly the case, although in his case (and Moses's), G-d revealed himself in a more direct manner that didn't rely completely on faith.

              For many other Jews, peer pressure, or belief that Judaism is an ethical approach to follow anyway (even if you don't believe in G-d), might motivate them to follow the mitzvot. According to Judaism, the latter are no worse Jews than the former. A Jew who believes but doesn't perform good deeds is a worse Jew than one who is agnostic or atheist who still does.

              The Masoretic texts point to different language than the KJV or other Christian retellings of Jewish scripture (or Islamic ones, for that matter). Deut 32:20 chastises a "treacherous breed, children with no loyalty in them" (again, no belief is mentioned; they were praying to idols, which contravenes a mitzvah). In Num 12:7 he says Moses is "trusted throughout My household." Again, no mention of belief. Moses was chosen because he was trusted to convey an important message accurately (in contrast to his siblings, Miriam and Aaron).

              The Christian and Muslim texts translate the original Hebrew texts differently and come to different conclusions. Jews, Muslims and Christians believe in the same G-d but draw different beliefs about him.

  34. huckabilly profile image60
    huckabillyposted 5 years ago

    It is a very simple reason, really. He chose the Jews as an EXAMPLE and he chose them because of their weakness. He did this to show His power. It is the same reason He made David a King (because he was weak). The example of the Jews is an example for the entire world about what people should and shouldn’t do. They have given us equal of examples of both, as you might note by reading the Bible.

  35. profile image0
    Muldanianmanposted 5 years ago

    Of course, the books of the Old Testament claim that God chose the Jews, because they were written by Jews.  It is common for religious groups to believe that they are God's chosen people.  As a former Jehovah's Witness, I believed that I belonged to the chosen people.  The pope has claimed that the Roman Catholic religion is the one true path to God.  There are few religions which recognise the worth of other religions, because this would diminish their own worth.  What other evidence is there that God chose the Jews, other than the writings of the Jews themselves?

  36. dutchman1951 profile image60
    dutchman1951posted 5 years ago

    I always thought...
    He chose them because of a Covenant He made with Abraham, (Old Testimate)

    I guess, in theory, God could have chosen any ethnic group or even none at all.  However, He did decide that the Messiah (Jesus) would come in a particular way at a particular time.

    To ask why Jesus came from the Jews is to ask why God chose Abraham.  The Old Testament explains that preparation for the Messiah began with God's selection of Abraham to be the forefather of the Redeemer. 

    Thats all I know about it, I may not be totaly correct here.




    'In Theory, Practice and Theory work together, but in Practice...it never does"  - Yogi Berra

  37. davidkaluge profile image74
    davidkalugeposted 5 years ago

    I think someone made a good sense by saying the Jews wrote the bible. It is their God although they said he is the God of all nations. But we know know each tribe had their own God and if they should turn their history to a scripture then you will know that  God love them more than he loved the Jews. This because one man serves a God that does not love him.The point is that the bible spread and displaced other traditional religions so it seems God loves and choose the Jews. A God for all must love equally.

 
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