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Would u get into a relationship with someone who has bipolar??

  1. bipolar girl profile image60
    bipolar girlposted 8 years ago

    Would u get into a relationship with someone who has bipolar? And at which point should the person actually tell u they have bipolar?

    1. profile image0
      bloodnlatexposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I would in a heartbeat if she looked like you....

    2. emdi profile image75
      emdiposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      It seems someone very close to u have this problem. If I were you, I will stick to the relation and try to be more tolarent when the person behaves in strange way, as I understand he or she has the problem. I define this as the true LOVE.

      To understand this, just put urself in the foot of a bipolar and ask yourself, do you want your loving parner to leave you, because you are bipolar.

      Do unto others what you want others to do unto you.

    3. Daniel Carter profile image79
      Daniel Carterposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I would get into a relationship with someone I truly loved, and who truly loved me. The rest is damned hard work by both. Both will have to put forth lots of effort to make it work. And that's really the only rub.

      1. Aya Katz profile image83
        Aya Katzposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Daniel, define "truly love."

        1. Daniel Carter profile image79
          Daniel Carterposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          More than infatuation. Experienced many things together, survived stressors, seen each other at best and worst, tried over time, and still willing to continue on. And for the record, I'm not in that position, but at some point, I hope to be ready for it.

    4. Margie01 profile image56
      Margie01posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I actually married someone that was diagnosed, didn't tell me until we had a fight and I asked if he was...sarcastically.  Had he told me upfront and I made the choice to stay than I could have dealt better, but not knowing and suffering through it for almost 8 years was just to much for me.  Stay away if you are in a similiar situation.

    5. profile image0
      cosetteposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      sure, why not.

      p.s. it's very possible i have been and didn't know it. if someone is, he can tell me when he is ready and feels comfortable with me.

      1. wyanjen profile image79
        wyanjenposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Would it be a deal breaker if your relationship was just casual?

    6. dutchman1951 profile image60
      dutchman1951posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Not if I knew it, I'd be a good friend, but be truthfull to that person about it, and still be that friend they need.

      Jon

    7. GoldiString profile image60
      GoldiStringposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      The manic-depressive episode would be like a merry go round -roller coaster ride! but then...love conquers all, love is unconditional and knows no boundaries. So, yes if i am so into him.

      P.S. will make sure he takes his psychotropic med religiously.

    8. profile image0
      Ghost32posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I AM in a relationhsip (marriage) with a bipolar girl.  13 years with Pam and counting.  None of my six divorces involved a bipolar (or any other kind of bi, darn it), nor did any of 'em last past 8 years, so I guess the variety  (within Pam) must have been just what I needed.

      As to your obviously very serious question about "when to tell", seems to me that's a play-it-by-the-ear sort of thing for sure.  With me, obviously, the "when" didn't matter (I knew pretty quickly with Pam, but I've also been a counselor and social worker and Pam has other issues such as paranoid schizophrenia, just to name one, and had been homeless for nearly 3 years when we met).

      Anyway, to get back on track, here are a couple of "hypothetical situations":

      1.  You "test" the guy a bit and find out he's so narrow minded he'd leave the original Puritans because they were too liberal.  Don't tell that dude, ever.  Don't look back, either.

      2.  The subject comes up in "casual" (yeah, right) conversation and he tells you about his bipolar niece who is the apple of the family's eye.  Going with that, you say, "want another one?"...that is, if you're serious enough  about the dude to make such an offer.

      One thing for sure:  I'd gladly accept a bipolar girl ANY time rather than a sweetie with, oh, say, herpes or HIV. big_smile

    9. mandybeau1 profile image60
      mandybeau1posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Is Biopolar the same as Schzihophenia? Its just it seems to have only existed lately.I had a friend who was a Manic depressive, I found it hard going, and was secretly pleased when she left Town, her Husband didn't want to know, and her Daughter was embarrassed and I spent 6 months visiting a Mental institute, because she wanted Visitors, and they never came. So it is hard, I am sorry to say I wouldn't go looking for one. But I guess you can't dump someone that is sick either. Horrible, situation.

      1. Ms Chievous profile image80
        Ms Chievousposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        No Bipolar and Schizophrenia are different. Bipolar has to to do more with mood swings and poor impulse control.  Schizophrenia is  when a person suffers from a delusion, hears voices or sees things that are not there.. The two can be mixed at times ( ie Bipolar disorder with psychotic features)

        1. mandybeau1 profile image60
          mandybeau1posted 8 years agoin reply to this

          Thanks that would explain the diff. between my friend and the guy that was conversing with a couple of people. She said that the Doctors blamed his Schizorephrenia on Drug abuse, and said it was getting scarily more and more prevalent.

  2. anime_nanet profile image61
    anime_nanetposted 8 years ago

    If the girl told me she was bipolar that would be great! It meant that she already accepted her disease, which is very hard for many people with bipolar disorder, and a very good indicator that she was well on her way to treat herself.

    If so, why not start a relationship? If I already loved the person, that would not make such a big difference. Yes, I would have to cope with mood swings. But, if controled, bipolarisn't that bad.If not, than it's havoc. It would be case-to-case, and depending on the commitment of the person to treat herself.

  3. profile image0
    \Brenda Scullyposted 8 years ago

    so many people have bipolar, but it is not diagnosed.... if someone had it was getting the right treatment, and was loving and kind....... what would be the problem with that....

    would you get into a relationship with someone with a heart defect..... what is the difference really?

  4. salt profile image72
    saltposted 8 years ago

    My partner has that diagnosis, but we are seeing an end to the worst of it. The medical profession labels alot of these as chronic and there is hope and alot of people lead very productive lives...

    There are some great natural remedies, from using quinessences to clear energy and eft, if you know anyone who does theta healing
    and I do a form of time line healing. If you know your ancestory, you can clear linkages from different time frames that may be creating inbalances in your life.((())) There are great things you can do. Life can be good and look to the middle answer, when you think black or white, think about whats inbetween those two opposing thoughts.. Breath alot and smile!!!

  5. tantrum profile image61
    tantrumposted 8 years ago

    No, I wouldn't

  6. Bard of Ely profile image86
    Bard of Elyposted 8 years ago

    Yes, and I have been in one! Actually I have a lot of good friends who are depressives or bi-polar!

  7. profile image0
    Poppa Bluesposted 8 years ago

    Probably not, unless I knew at the outset the person was bi-polar. Bipolar people can have personality and mood swings and for me that woiuld be a turn off if I didn't know where it was coming from. Knowing they have the condition makes all the difference in the world and understanding and acceptance of their condition could allow love to bloom fully.

  8. rebekahELLE profile image90
    rebekahELLEposted 8 years ago

    I don't think it matters what anyone 'has', no one is perfect. If the partner is upfront and open in the relationship, taking necessary medication, there should be every opportunity for love and happiness. I have worked with children and adults with bi-polar and they were very loving people! smile

  9. Tom Cornett profile image79
    Tom Cornettposted 8 years ago

    I did....until she got depressed and gave a cab driver a ride home from Bingo!

    1. bipolar girl profile image60
      bipolar girlposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Lol are you searious?! I believe you actually i've done some pretty crazy things when i've been depressed

      1. Tom Cornett profile image79
        Tom Cornettposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Oh yeah...I'm serious...she wound up in KY one night with a lesbian truck driver who I originally thought was a guy.  She was bi Polar and Bi sexual....I was Binnanas!

  10. profile image43
    BadCoposted 8 years ago

    No !

  11. RedSonja94 profile image60
    RedSonja94posted 8 years ago

    I would have to say yes.  As long as I knew up front that he was bipolar I would know what to expect.  I can live with someone having problems as long as I care about that person.

  12. rebekahELLE profile image90
    rebekahELLEposted 8 years ago

    if someone has bi-polar or has any form of disability, it does not define who the person is, only it is a part of the person and something they must deal with and those who are close to them.

  13. jiberish profile image71
    jiberishposted 8 years ago

    Would I get into a relationshio with someone who has bipolar?

    Somedays I would, somedays I wouldn't, depends how I felt that day.

    1. tantrum profile image61
      tantrumposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      big_smile

  14. pageantgirl31413 profile image82
    pageantgirl31413posted 8 years ago

    Depending the severity of the bipolar. My ex was bipolar and he was really bad. If it were like him, no I wouldn't.

  15. mkott profile image77
    mkottposted 8 years ago

    For those that say they wouldn't; you probably know someone that is bipolar and don't even know it. 

    I know moody people that aren't bipolar.

    And to answer the question, Yes.  I have never dated anyone that I know of that was bipolar.  I have dealt with a few family memebers and friends that are bipolar. 

    Today getting treatment isn't a taboo like it was 30 years ago.

    1. profile image43
      BadCoposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I know people with Bipolar, if I didn't I wouldn't have replied.

    2. LondonGirl profile image86
      LondonGirlposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Or they know someone who is.

      In the UK, we still largely call it manic-depression. My best mate suffered badly in her early 20s - suicide attempts, sectioning in a secure ward, the lot.

  16. sooner than later profile image56
    sooner than laterposted 8 years ago

    bipolar girl-

    you must have more things that you are interested in?

    1. bipolar girl profile image60
      bipolar girlposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Yip loads of things interest me but i only write about bipolar on this

  17. getitrite profile image80
    getitriteposted 8 years ago

    I was in a relationship with someone who has bi-polar disorder, and it was more than I could handle.  So, no to this question.

    1. profile image0
      rednckwmnposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      my father was bi-polar, and refused to admit it or get help.
      I would not wish to be involved with someone who willing denied they needed help. Romanticly, I am unavailable. As a friend, I would do anything I could, as long as it truly helped.

      1. bipolar girl profile image60
        bipolar girlposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        I see your point, as afriend i guess you could cope with it but it's a bit much if youre in a relationship with someone who has it. I'm bipolar and i must admit i couldnt go with someone with bipolar, even if i ever fully get over it.

  18. wychic profile image90
    wychicposted 8 years ago

    I don't know that I would, but only because I am such a "fussable" person (as my other half puts it) and need someone who is very level-headed. I do have a lot of up-and-downs and past experience has shown me that it just doesn't work if I have someone who is equally up-and-down...or moreso...though my ex never admitted to any issues so it was a pretty scary situation.

  19. Stacie L profile image90
    Stacie Lposted 8 years ago

    Unfortunately I think all my ex's are bi polar!
    i seem to attract them...or I'm attracted to them
    who knows? hmm

  20. Ms Chievous profile image80
    Ms Chievousposted 8 years ago

    If the person accepts the diagnosis and treatment for it then it would be ok to be in a relationship.

    Borderline personality disorder is a definate NO!!

    1. profile image0
      rednckwmnposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      borderline personality is the new bipolar. they renamed it, to be more PC

      1. bipolar girl profile image60
        bipolar girlposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Yip your right borderline is very similar to bipolar but it is different. I was diagnosed with bipolar 11 and borderline when i was 17 thankfully tho i seem to have grown out of the borderline but they are very similar. For me though borderline was definetly the hardest to deal with with bipolar you get periods of stability in between but borderlines more of a daily thing.

        1. Ms Chievous profile image80
          Ms Chievousposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          Bipolar girl is right.. they are not the same thing.  Bipolar can be treated with medications. There are no medications for borderline personality disorder... You have to do some hard therapy for that!  Good for you Bipolar girl that you have grown out of it..

  21. profile image0
    bloodnlatexposted 8 years ago

    Bipolar girl, I admire you for addressing that you have it and being open about it.  Too many poeple refuse to accept that there is anything wrong with them.

    1. Mary Jane22 profile image60
      Mary Jane22posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Agreed bloodnlatex!!

  22. Sophia Heresford profile image68
    Sophia Heresfordposted 8 years ago

    There are some bipolar bloggers/writers that I greatly admire, but to be in any kind of relationship with them? I don't know. I have a chronic illness of my own, I'm not sure I could handle BP if I was ill--you know? 

    I'm very grateful that my DH is healthy and he is my rock because I am not always 100%.

    The BP people I have known have been very unstable and chaotic which does not mesh well with my personality. So no.

    Sophia

  23. maribin profile image60
    maribinposted 8 years ago

    I'm sorry,  what I have  to say is no, I don't know how to handle them.

  24. Shalini Kagal profile image81
    Shalini Kagalposted 8 years ago

    Aya - how about accept and put first - without being servile? smile

    1. Aya Katz profile image83
      Aya Katzposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Shalini, "accept and put first, without being servile" sounds like a good way to describe truly loving our children. Because the relationship is between unequals, for the time they are dependent on us, we put them first and do what is best for them, but not necessarily always what they want.

      Between equals, though, how can you put someone else first, without being servile? For that matter, how can you do what is best for them, if it is not what they want?

      1. Shalini Kagal profile image81
        Shalini Kagalposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Aya - if both accept and put the other first, it would be equal, wouldn't it? smile
        I think it would take a strong person with a large and giving heart to make such a relationship work. Someone who can accept without labelling and judging. Someone who wants the person to get better for his/her own sake, not change for the sake of the world. Takes a lot of loving!

      2. LondonGirl profile image86
        LondonGirlposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        A very good definition, thanks!

  25. profile image0
    kaceybabeposted 8 years ago

    no matter what a person has, there is always something deeper to find in them. a mental health doesnt change the person they are. It just confuses who they really are. Bipolar can go from one extreme to another but they can also go thro long periods of being just fine.

    so yes i would have a relationship with someone who had bipolar, and i would be there to hold their hands thro the bad times. everybody needs somebody at some point in there life! x

  26. BeccaHubbardWoods profile image92
    BeccaHubbardWoodsposted 8 years ago

    My husband has bipolar disorder. He refuses medication. I live his disease. He has a very severe form of bipolar, as well, and can be very verbally abusive when he is on a down day. He can be equally loving when he is on an up day. I never know what to expect when he wakes up and it is utterly exhausting. I continuously walk on eggshells just to keep the peace in my home. So the answer to the question is, no, I would never again get into a relationship with someone afflicted with bipolar disorder. Unless they agree to take their medication.

    1. Daniel Carter profile image79
      Daniel Carterposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Is it unfair or too much to ask why you continue to stay? It seems to me to make a relationship work, it can't be one sided. It seems your husband is rather irresponsible about his disease, in that doing nothing is his best plan. There are options that include taking meds and improving life-style. There are options where people have made huge gains in their lives through natural means. There are options and he chooses not to make a plan. I'm not sure it's healthy for either of you, but perhaps I'm speaking out of turn here. Just my observations.

      1. BeccaHubbardWoods profile image92
        BeccaHubbardWoodsposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        It's not unfair at all to ask why I stay. I wonder myself. I still haven't figured it out myself. Perhaps it's that I keep telling myself eventually he will change and we can live the happy life. We've already been together 7 years and I've put up with it this long (yes, I know "but to what price"). Some call it patience, others call it stupidity. I call it simply waiting and watching. Who knows what the future will bring.

        1. profile image0
          Ghost32posted 8 years agoin reply to this

          Becca, it's seldom that anyone other than you yourself can know when it's time to go (or not go).  I knew almost immediately that my 3rd marriage was a very serious mistake.  How immediately?  Um...our wedding night, actually.  Yet it still took me 3 years and 3 months to make the break.  Looking back, it was exactly the right amount of time.  Took some distance to get that great 20-20 hindsight, though.

    2. profile image0
      Ghost32posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Becca, I understand your position perfectly.  Based on my bipolar wife's experience, though, agreeing to take the meds might not be enough.  Especially since with the onset of dementia to add to that (nowadays), she doesn't always KNOW  if she took a given medication or not...and I don't always have the time (or energy) to monitor it for her.

    3. Deborah-Lynn profile image80
      Deborah-Lynnposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      My dad was diagnosed with BiPolar Disorder, or Manic Depression, only after he was discharged from the Army.  He did not believe the medication was helping him so he refused to take it, four daughters survived his insanity, but greatly scarred physically and emotionally, think of the children, before you even take a step toward emotional involvement, decide if you want children or not, if you don't, one of you have surgery to ensure you stick to the plan, but if you do want children, be careful who you fall in love with...you have a responsibility to your future kids. I know this sounds cold, but haven't you thought to yourself, sometimes, why does God allow children to experience abuse?  We have been given free will, here is one way He expects us to use it wisely.

      1. mandybeau1 profile image60
        mandybeau1posted 8 years agoin reply to this

        I really think it would be wrong to put kids in a situation like the one I observed.

  27. profile image43
    PirateGirlposted 8 years ago

    Deff not they are way off the scale !

  28. Wendi M profile image79
    Wendi Mposted 8 years ago

    Why not?  If you truly loved the person, why not?  How would it be any different than getting into a relationship with a person who has diabetes?  They are both conditions that can be treated, not something that makes a person less worthy of love than others!

    1. Ms Chievous profile image80
      Ms Chievousposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      It's not about being less worthy.. its about being strong enough to put up with the others behaviors if not on medication, and strong enough to continue to support them. Diabeties and Bipolar are not similar.  If you don't take you medicaiton for diabeties you get ill... If you don't take your medication for bipolar you can do a lot of things that may drive your signifant other to the brink..

      1. Wendi M profile image79
        Wendi Mposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Oh I understand that, I just think that if you truly love someone, it wouldn't matter what illness they have.

        1. OTmommy profile image61
          OTmommyposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          I had a roommate with bipolar disorder and also have a relative with it. In addition, I used to work in a mental health facility. When a person with bipolar is on the appropriate medicine, the relationship probably has a chance. But when not on medicine, it can be hard to deal with their depression and all that it brings. When in the manic state, many bipolars make some really poor choices. These choices may include illegal drug use, infedility, debt, and the list goes on. However, I know this is not the case for all people with bipolar disorder. No relationship is easy, and when you stack these circumstances into the situation, it makes the survival of such a relationship even less likely.

        2. Deborah-Lynn profile image80
          Deborah-Lynnposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          Wendy, you need to understand the violent side of Manic depression, beatings, spousal abuse, children locked in closets, being raped...truely it's not only the Schizophrenic illnesses that cause next generational tramas. I loved my dad but I was taken away at age sixteen, as an adult I was afraid to be in the same room alone with him, love could not help that.  Dad loved me, the wrong way, my love was that of a child who needed a daddy.

          1. Lee Boolean profile image58
            Lee Booleanposted 8 years agoin reply to this

            I can relate to what you are saying, truly a sad situation that you were in. It should just be said that the kind of behavior you were exposed to is not inevitable for someone with bipolar. There are a lot of really bad people out there, and a medical condition is not a free ticket to treating other people like dirt. I would hope that if someone suffers abuse, no matter what the name of the condition is would have enough sense to get out of the situation if they can, of course as a child your possibilities were limited.

            Sorry that you had to suffer so much, as you say, sometimes love does not heal all.

    2. LondonGirl profile image86
      LondonGirlposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      It's not a question of worthy or otherwise.

      Personally, emotional tranquility is important for me at home. I'd find it hard to cope with a partner / spouse who was manic-depressive.

  29. donotfear profile image88
    donotfearposted 8 years ago

    As long as the person took their meds.

  30. wyanjen profile image79
    wyanjenposted 8 years ago

    Most people who know me have no idea I have it.
    If you understand the disability you can function just fine with the right kind of help.

  31. profile image0
    sneakorocksolidposted 8 years ago

    Yes absolutely.smile........OH HELL NO!!!yikes

  32. profile image0
    cosetteposted 8 years ago

    not at all.

    1. wyanjen profile image79
      wyanjenposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I'm picking your brain now...

      Would you feel like you were being lied to if someone you were dating kept it a secret from you?
      Or would you think that if it wasn't an issue anyway, than it's not important?

      1. profile image0
        cosetteposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        no, i wouldn't feel lied to. everyone has a right to privacy. i do think it is important but not to the point where the person feels compelled to confide something when he is not comfortable with ME yet.

        if the person were a hatchet murderer or bank robber or gay yes i would want to know right away smile

        1. wyanjen profile image79
          wyanjenposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          Thanks.
          One problem with BP is that is can be hard to read a situation like this. I do feel compelled, but I'm not sure why.
          I'm exactly at that point in a relationship right now.  (Great timing for this forum lol Thanks bipolar girl)
          It will work out for us or it won't. BP should not be an issue I think. Otherwise I would already have ended it. But I do wonder if I handle it the right way... I'm not trying to avoid it, and I don't want it to look like I'm keeping a dark and terrible secret. But why open the door if there isn't a problem there?
          Thanks for the input everybody ;-)

  33. profile image0
    cosetteposted 8 years ago

    good luck! i hope everything works out for you.

    1. wyanjen profile image79
      wyanjenposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      smile

  34. profile image0
    Useful Knowledgeposted 8 years ago

    Bipolar people are awesome!!!!!

    1. dohn121 profile image84
      dohn121posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I agree, some of them are divine big_smile

      1. profile image0
        Useful Knowledgeposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        They rock!!! I feel this way because one day you can have a depressed and sad person, and the next day, you are with a completely different person. Never a dull moment.

        1. dohn121 profile image84
          dohn121posted 8 years agoin reply to this

          I just hope that I don't have to wear a hockey mask to date one sad

          1. profile image0
            Useful Knowledgeposted 8 years agoin reply to this

            That would not be fun.

            1. dohn121 profile image84
              dohn121posted 8 years agoin reply to this

              Well, it would certainly be a head-turner/conversation piece the first date.  But then afterwards...

  35. thanglynn07 profile image58
    thanglynn07posted 8 years ago

    I can't believe all the stuff I'm reading on here. Where is the compassion? Everyone deserves to be loved. Everyone deserves happiness.  Why are we judging others by something that is beyond their control? However I do agree that if you are in a relationship you should inform your partner of your illness in the beginning of the relationship. This way the recipient can prepare him or herself and ultimately decide to leave or see it thru...If the person chooses to leave don't feel discouraged. Be thankful because better now than later down the road when more emotions have developed.

    My best friend is bipolar and I'm not going to lie, sometimes it is very hard. But I have to keep in mind that she has an illness. One that at first she was afraid to tell me about because of some of the reactions she has gotten from others. It is not her fault that she has a chemical imbalance in her brain. I think it is harder for her to deal with than it is for me. She does get overly emotional at times and sometimes we do argue but we manage to work things out because we love and care for each other. I love her to death and I wish I could take away her pain, her frustration. She is a genuinely good person with a heart of gold. She loves with all her heart and is overall a very good friend...It saddens me that she has to live with this illness where sometimes her emotions get the best of her.

  36. Lee Boolean profile image58
    Lee Booleanposted 8 years ago

    Yes of course you should, they are great people.... then again, no you shouldn't, they are really stressy, but perhaps you should, they are great! then again....

    You fall in love with someone not because or despite a condition like this, you just fall in love with them, warts and all. Everyone has good and bad properties, you just have to find someone who makes you happy, usually you can live with their shortcomings.

  37. Lee Boolean profile image58
    Lee Booleanposted 8 years ago

    I am bipolar, and of course its not the easiest thing to live with, but if you have the right attitude and recognize the signs correctly you can even live quite well without medication. Meds tend to not only take away the bad but also the good side of BPD.
    A new school of thought is that it is less of a disease than it is a strategy for survival, manic depressives have a few advantages, we can work at 120% in the right situations. Many great minds were bipolar. The key is not to go into a downward spiral, an understanding partner could be your biggest asset, but not if either of you are abusive about it. Respect,love and understanding can make all the difference. At the end, if you know your partner or potential partner has BPD, you must be honest about how strong you can be in this situation, and inform yourself about how to handle this odd variation of the human condition.

    I do agree with Deborah-Lynn though, one should be very sure whether kids are a good idea, it is hereditary to a certain extent but besides this, manic depressives do have a tendency toward substance and people abuse. The point is, you might get to know someone in his manic phase, and it may be the most rewarding thing that ever happened, there is no larger mania than love, you might not know about BPD until after you tie the knot... or they may develop it later in life. Either way, there are no guarantees in life and after all its a matter of being with the person, not the condition. If he/she loves and respects you enough, they will seek help if things get rough, if not get out.

  38. RedSonja94 profile image60
    RedSonja94posted 8 years ago

    I am bipolar as well.  I have to stay on my meds or I'm an insane woman.  I have three children though and I deeply love all of my boys.  I wouldn't say that being bipolar is a bad thing for a parent.  I do wonderfully with my boys and am not abusive either.  I would say it really depends on the situation and whether you are the abusive type to begin with.

  39. DonnaCSmith profile image89
    DonnaCSmithposted 8 years ago

    I think the key is to educate yourself about the disease and know what you are dealing with. There is a wide range of degrees of severity, many different ways people are affected by bipolar. It is hard to deal with, but knowledge is the key, along with love.

  40. Lee Boolean profile image58
    Lee Booleanposted 8 years ago

    just as a matter of related trivia, when I was a teenager someone suggested an exorcism since it was very obvious to that person that some evil demon had gotten hold of me... for those of you in denial, this might still be an option.

  41. wombatatcha profile image55
    wombatatchaposted 8 years ago

    The key is getting though the depression without getting into a fight, then it brings you closer.

  42. Len Cannon profile image90
    Len Cannonposted 8 years ago

    I have in the past, and I don't regret it at all. Quite to the contrary. But it is difficult and not to be taken lightly.

  43. fortunerep profile image82
    fortunerepposted 8 years ago

    I can't put my link on here but I wrote a hub ho heal to deal with someone with bipolar by request, read if you like, it explains alot, Nice to meet you Bipolar girl, I must say we will get along great when we're both depressed.  lol

    dori

  44. seamist profile image66
    seamistposted 8 years ago

    I am involved with a man who has bipolar, and no, I would not do it again. Why? Before I begin, I will state that I am sure everyone who has biplar is different. However, in my case, living with him is like being on the edge all the time. You have to watch how you word everything. Secondly, it seems like they want support but aren't able to give it. It sucks always having to be the strong one and not having anyone to understand or comfort you when you need it.

 
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