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What Book are you reading, just read, plan to read?

  1. ptosis profile image79
    ptosisposted 4 years ago

    Let's share good books.
    I recommend
    "Fall of Giants" (pre-WW1 drama history) 1k+ pages
    "Pillars of the Earth" (medieval drama history) 1k+ pages
    "Dreyfus Affair" (France SNAFU history) 500+ pages

    currently reading
    "SpyMaster" (autobio from Olec Kalugin) 450+ pages

    and plan to read online the latest book from Latif Yahia "Black Hole",same guy who wrote "Devil's Double" book & movie about being Uday Hussain's bullet catcher.


    http://latifyahia2006.blogspot.com/2009 … lcome.html
    http://images.craigslist.org/5L75K75M23K93I23Hec47abbf4f1007c61cf8.jpg

    1. Chris Neal profile image84
      Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      If the "Spymaster" you're going to read is the same one I read, that's a good book.

      "The Jefferson Lies" by David Barton. I'm immensely enjoying that one.

      "Hedge Britannia" by Hugh Barker. Yeah, it's not for everyone (literally, it's a history of British Hedges) but it's funny and also historically interesting, if you're into that sort of thing.

      1. ptosis profile image79
        ptosisposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Finished reading "SpyMaster" from Olec Kalugin and now reading Into the Mirror: The Life of Robert P. Hanssen by Norman Mailer and Lawrence Schiller.

        Very interesting that the two books mention the same names. In Spymaster, the SVG didn't know who was feeding them info until Hanssen was arrested.

        Read Spymaster first
        then  Comrade J
        and then Into the Mirror

        They are all related

        I'm in a reading frenzy because even though I have a swimming pool - can't be out there all day in the merciless sunshine even with SPF 50 all day long and it's 98 degrees.

        Planning to go to library for more books.



        http://s4.hubimg.com/u/6774291_f248.jpg

        1. sen.sush23 profile image60
          sen.sush23posted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Can I talk about non-fiction? big_smile big_smile

          1. ptosis profile image79
            ptosisposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            ??? All three all those books are non-fiction!

            1. sen.sush23 profile image60
              sen.sush23posted 4 years ago in reply to this

              Oops! Sorry! I just missed out the genre of the first three..hmm, I would like to check out your list..they sound interesting. I have been reading something that is quite elementary and old, but I am finding it interesting. It is a 'Critical Introduction to  W.B.Yeats' by Stan Smith. As usual, I am enjoy the introduction most.

              1. ptosis profile image79
                ptosisposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                No Prob - I'm into non-fiction spy books now ( it's SO HOT outside!) NEXT: "My Silent War" by Kim Philby

        2. Chris Neal profile image84
          Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Not the same one I read. Back in the 80's, there was a book that had (I think)  the same title. It was written by a former member of MI6, about the infamous Kim Philby affair. It was very good. Little self-serving, but still a cracking good read!

          1. ptosis profile image79
            ptosisposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            Yeah, started reading it yesterday, "My Silent War", after reading the other book, this book seems antiqued. So dated since in one of the later books Olec visits Philby was was an old broken man, ignored.

            1. Chris Neal profile image84
              Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              I read the book back in the 1980's, and it was about something that happened (if I remember correctly!) in the 1950's. I would be surprised if any of the people involved are even still alive!

              Here's how long ago I read it,  the general consensus seems to be that Philby is "pink" (boy, talk about antiquated phrasing!) Philby himself was quite coy. And the guy who wrote "Spymaster" (which because of the Official Secrets Act was not published in his native England) thought Philby was completely red.

              Is that as confusing to you as it is to me?

              1. ptosis profile image79
                ptosisposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                Ugh - put down My silent war - the book sucks

    2. Cagsil profile image83
      Cagsilposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Presently, I have a set of books which I have been reading, then re-reading, then re-reading, which would seem to be ridiculous, but I continue to learn from them.

      I apologize, I am unable to name the books, due to other agreements in place. However, the books cover religion, politics, philosophy, wealth, power, logic, reasoning and more, and is backed by thousands upon thousands of years of research by many people who have lived, breathed and died.

    3. Shinkicker profile image91
      Shinkickerposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I'm reading 'A Treatise on Human Nature' by the great 18thC Scottish philosopher David Hume

      1. 0
        whowasposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        David Hume is my absolute favorite among the British Empiricists.

    4. 0
      whowasposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Currently reading:
      'The Origin and Evolution of Birds' by Alan Feduccia
      'The Beak of The Finch - Evolution in Real Time' by Jonathan Weiner
      'The Old Curiosity Shop' by Charles Dickens
      'La Fine e' Il Mio Inizio' by Tiziano Terzani

      Lined up at the top of a very big pile...

      'Behavioral Ecology' by Krebs & Davis
      'The Ancestor's Tale' by Richard Dawkins (writing as a scientist not a polemicist)
      'Europe: A History' by Norman Davies
      '800 Years of Women's Letters' by Olga Kenyon
      'Terminal World' by Alistair Reynolds
      'This Moment on Earth' by John and Teresa Kerry

      Just finished...

      'La Bottega Dei Gioccatoli'  by Angela Carter
      'Refusing to Be a Man - Essays on Sex and Justice' by John Stoltenberg
      'Ethnic Conflict in The Western World' ed. Milton J. Esman
      'Of Bread and Guns' by Nigel Harris
      'Fundamentals of Conservation Biology' by Malcolm L. Hunter
      'The Mind of God' by Paul Davies
      'Complete Poetical Works' by Andrew Marvell

      1. ptosis profile image79
        ptosisposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Wow! you read a lot a books! Is this in one month or what?!

        1. 0
          whowasposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Yes I do read all the time. I always have a book with me and I just read whenever I can. I'm thinking about getting an eReader to make it more convenient but a lot of the books wouldn't really work in that format (stuff with scientific diagrams for example). No, not a month, a couple maybe. But I can happily get through a book in a day. It really depends what it is. The history of Europe, for example, might take me a year because I'll be thinking critically and cross-referencing a lot. 'Of Bread and Guns' only took an hour and a half. I really should find the time to read more fiction.

          Everyone must read 'Captain Corelli's Mandolin' by Louis de Berniere (the Nicholas Cage movie bears no resemblance to the book at all and they completely changed the ending) as it is a work of genius. Also, I challenge anyone with a heart not to weep buckets through the entire final three chapters!

    5. Chris Neal profile image84
      Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Just finished:

      The Jefferson Lies by David Barton
      Being George Washington by Glen Beck
      Bloody Crimes by James L Swanson

      I love American history!

    6. Chris Neal profile image84
      Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Okay, I admit it, this isn't great literature, but I'm going to start "Black Jack Justice" by Gregg Taylor because I love the audio dramas so much!

    7. Chris Neal profile image84
      Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I'm reading The Presidents Club by Nancy Gibbs and Michael Duffy. Definitely recommend, it's helped me see both Nixon and Clinton a little more clearly.

      Also recommend Boomerang by  Michael Lewis. It's about how the global downturn has effected the world. The chapter on Greece is worth the price of admission, I understand Greece more now, though I like it less.

  2. janesix profile image60
    janesixposted 4 years ago

    Eye of the World by Robert Jordan

  3. Keith Ham profile image61
    Keith Hamposted 4 years ago

    I just read Under The Dome by Stephen King, even wrote a review. My next book is most likely going to be... on my shelf. I haven't decided yet.

    1. ptosis profile image79
      ptosisposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I used to be a Stephen king fanatic until about the third book of the Gunslinger series when he said that he was planning a total of 7,000 pages in total. Heard in the last of the book series - he puts himself in it. Must've wrote himself into a corner like the TV series "LOST"?


      Still like the short story about the werewolf with Gary Busey in it.

      Silver Bullet
      http://s2.hubimg.com/u/6738525_f248.jpg

      1. Keith Ham profile image61
        Keith Hamposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Yeah, the Dark Tower Series is a hate it or love it sort of thing. Good comparison to LOST though, especially seeing the story goes almost completely insane at one point. He wrote a prequel recently to the Dark Tower, however, I don't exactly know how that is possible... especially seeing that Insomnia tied into it as well.

        1. Aaron-Clark profile image61
          Aaron-Clarkposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Books 5,6, and 7 of The Dark Tower series are must-reads (meaning the entire series is as it's basically one long book). It's so amazing what he does in the series. Unfortunately, they only seem to be read by the more avid King fans.

          Keith, the new one (The WInd Through The Keyhole) is written so that it happens in the middle of books 4 and 5. It's basically Book 4.5. It's on the shorter side but it really packs a punch. It is an amazing story and could even stand by itself separate from the series. I've read everything by King and The Wind Through The Keyhole is honestly one of my favorite things he's ever written.

  4. Daughter Of Maat profile image97
    Daughter Of Maatposted 4 years ago

    I tend to read a few books at a time. I'm actually reading "Niacin the real story," and "vitamin C the real story." Boring I know. big_smile

  5. silverstararrow profile image85
    silverstararrowposted 4 years ago

    I'm currently reading Vikram Seth's 'A Suitable Boy'. Once I finish this 1.3k+ mammoth, I've Salman Rushdie's 'Midnight's Children' lined up on my book shelf.

    I'm halfway through Vikram Seth's 'A Suitable Boy'. This 1300+ pages epic is a mesmerising combination of all those things that you crave in a good book. A post Partition/Independence India is the backdrop with all its prejudices, moral values, communal ideologies, ideals and corrupt politics. Beneath all this is a mother's struggle to find a suitable boy for her daughter and the girl's naive love story that's oddly touching.

    1. travelespresso profile image84
      travelespressoposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I've just started reading Vikram Seth's An Equal Music.  So far, it's a great read and already lots of twists and turns.

  6. Healthy Pursuits profile image90
    Healthy Pursuitsposted 4 years ago

    I became interested in the histories written by Kurlansky. I read and loved Salt. Now I'm reading The Big Oyster. Next I'll read Cod. These histories are a little weird, because they tell the whole history in context, and you find out all kinds of things you didn't know. How the different parts affect each other and all circle around the commodity - salt, or oysters, so far - is really entertaining. You know, that whole "if this hadn't happened, that wouldn't have happened" thing. Only the first thing that had to happen is associated with the commodity being written about.

  7. elnavann profile image77
    elnavannposted 4 years ago

    I just finished reading "Salmon Fishing In The Yemen" by Paul Torday.  Have not seen the movie yet and will probably do so.
    I enjoyed reading the book immensely - although afterwards thought that some of the methods used to convey the story (especially the interviews) were a bit superficial. The politicians and officials - and Fred Jones' wife are depicted with very little sympathy.  Maybe they deserve it. 
    The story itself is captivating and very original

  8. Marcy Goodfleisch profile image93
    Marcy Goodfleischposted 4 years ago

    Natural Born Celebrities: Serial Killers in Popular Culture.   Don't jump to conclusions about my tastes; I'm teaching a university course on the subject.  Just finished The Devil in the White City, about a grisly serial killer in 1890s Chicago.  They're both good books, but I'll be ready for something more uplifting when I'm through.

  9. jentaylorsc profile image61
    jentaylorscposted 4 years ago

    I am thinking about reading Hunger Games sometime soon. Also, I may start reading the Harry Potter series to my son soon. I haven't read them yet so we would both be reading them for the first time.

    1. Marcy Goodfleisch profile image93
      Marcy Goodfleischposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Both are great!  I've read most of Harry Potter (got delayed after Book Five & need to read the last two) and all of Hunger Games. Rarely have I just plain enjoyed anything as much as I did the very first Potter book.  Hunger Games was compelling and interesting. Both series are billed as books for youth, but they certainly have the sophistication for adults to appreciate them.

  10. 0
    ksinllposted 4 years ago

    I'm reading "The Quiet Girl" by Peter Hoeg and The second book in the Hunger Games series.  Also reading "The Shining", "Gulliver's Travels" (almost done) and "Middlemarch".  I want to read "Ficciones" by Jorge Louis Borges.

  11. kislany profile image60
    kislanyposted 4 years ago

    Right now reading My life next door, and also reading in parallel Kindred in Death by J.D.Robb. Both excellent books.

  12. 0
    jomineposted 4 years ago

    I'm reading 'thinking, fast and slow' by Kahneman, an art of survival biography of Talleyrand by orieux jean and 'from Socrates to Sartre by Lavine and economics by Samuelson now.
    I plan to read how mind works by pinker, fooled by randomness, shantaram by Roberts, zadig by voltaire, great gatsby and security analysis.

  13. Victoria Anne profile image95
    Victoria Anneposted 4 years ago

    I just started "50 Shades of Grey". I'm on chapter 3, and I feel like it isn't very well written. Not bad necessarily, just...immature. Of course then I learned it was originally written as a Twilight fan fiction and it all made sense.

  14. shalini sharan profile image74
    shalini sharanposted 4 years ago

    i would suggest Khalid Hosseini's 'The Kite Runner' and 'A Thousand Splendid Sons', the latter being more interesting. it overs a story of an afghani girl and how life turns miserable and how she finds a way of her own

    1. Victoria Anne profile image95
      Victoria Anneposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I just read 'The Kite Runner' and 'A Thousand Spendid Suns'. I enjoyed them both but I agree, Suns was better.

      1. 0
        jomineposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        To an extent it is good. The themes are similar in both.

    2. ashish04joshi profile image81
      ashish04joshiposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Have you watched the movie "the kite runner"? It's better than the book actually.

      1. Victoria Anne profile image95
        Victoria Anneposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        One of my friends saw the movie and loved it so that's what sparked my interest. I usually try to read the book before seeing the movie so I'll have to watch it now. Thanks for reminding me!

    3. Chris Neal profile image84
      Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I've been wanting to read "The Kite Runner."

      1. 0
        jomineposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        If you have read the splendid suns and liked it very much, then you might like it, otherwise it'll be a waste of time.

        1. Chris Neal profile image84
          Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Haven't read it. Only really know "Kite Runner" because of the movie but it sounds like a good one from the synopsis.

          1. travelespresso profile image84
            travelespressoposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            Oh it is!  The Kite Runner is a beautiful story.

            1. Chris Neal profile image84
              Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              Thank you!

          2. 0
            jomineposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            The pace and presentation is Good, I didn't like the climax and he is selling the misfortunes of Afganistan.

            1. Chris Neal profile image84
              Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              Thank you!

  15. ashish04joshi profile image81
    ashish04joshiposted 4 years ago

    I've just begun with "The First Man" by Albert Camus...and I'm already a fan. It's an autobiographical novel found at the site of the car accident which killed him when he was only 46. And it was an incomplete copy then.

  16. Reality Bytes profile image93
    Reality Bytesposted 4 years ago

    I just started reading: The Power Makers: Steam, Electricity, and the Men Who Invented Modern America

  17. ashish04joshi profile image81
    ashish04joshiposted 4 years ago

    Yeah it's really worth watching...such a thought provoking subject. And when it's a movie, it's an altogether different experience.

  18. shalini sharan profile image74
    shalini sharanposted 4 years ago

    i found another book called 'The Alchemy Of Desires', i started it, seems an interesting read

  19. 0
    Motown2Chitownposted 4 years ago

    The Picture of Dorian Gray.

    Different than I expected, but good so far.

  20. Danette Watt profile image87
    Danette Wattposted 4 years ago

    Read all of the Hunger Games books and enjoyed them.

    I'm re-reading The Passage by Justin Cronin, getting ready for the next in the series due out in Sept.

    I'm also reading a couple books on writing techniques.

  21. ptosis profile image79
    ptosisposted 4 years ago

    Just finished reading the most excellent book by maria goodavage - Soldier Dogs -
    This is what I wrote in the FB page for Soldier Dogs:

    "There seems to be a dichotomy with Solder Dogs having a higher rank than the handlers yet are still considered 'equipment'. A gun does not have rank.

    Perhaps this is a way to get Soldier Dogs recognized as canine personnel or nonhuman personnel under UCMJ - Article 134 - (Abusing public animal)"

    Please add link to petitioning DOD to continue funding after 10/12 as referred on page 187. Thank you in advance.

    http://s3.hubimg.com/u/6809674_f248.jpg

  22. SomewayOuttaHere profile image60
    SomewayOuttaHereposted 4 years ago

    2 books on the go...'a long way gone - memoirs of a boy soldier' and 'the girl who played with fire'

  23. ptosis profile image79
    ptosisposted 4 years ago

    Question: How do you pick out books?

    I do it 2 ways: when I'm on a subject - I reserve it from the library.
    when I'm at the library - I browse the new book non-fiction section.
    Sierra Vista Library is well-funded smile

    1. Chris Neal profile image84
      Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Since my main topics of interest are apologetics and theology (not necessarily in that order) I often browse catalogues.

      I like history, and bookstores are often good for that. I'm very much a classic bibliophile, so if I think the book is good, I want to keep it!

      Don't tell anyone, but chasing my daughter around Target has afforded me the opportunity to read several books.

    2. 0
      whowasposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Gosh, I am immersed in books - or they are constantly hurtling towards me as if I'm space-traveling through a literary asteroid belt - so I don't know about picking them out (which conjures up leisurely hours browsing through the shelves of a dusty used bookstore...) it's more a case of racing against time to read what there already is.

  24. mwales28 profile image58
    mwales28posted 4 years ago

    I am currently reading "Smokin' Seventeen" by Janet Evanovich.  Its seems dry in comparison to some of the books previously listed but I read according to my mood and lately I have been a little sad and these books will have me laughing out loud.  I have "Sing Me Home" by Jodi Picoult lined up to read next but I have to prepare myself for her books as they can be sad.

  25. Reality Bytes profile image93
    Reality Bytesposted 4 years ago

    I just finished "American Savior", it was about Jesus running for POTUS of the USA.

    Good book, funny.

    1. Druid Dude profile image61
      Druid Dudeposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I read a book a long time ago called "Christ On Trial" but I don't remember the author's name. I plan on reading from the "Book Of Life", but, I misplaced the key that unlocks it. 'Come and see!'smile

      1. 0
        jomineposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Then I suggest 'the last temptation of Christ' by nikos Kazantzakis, you might like it.

        1. 0
          whowasposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          I haven't read the book but I saw the movie and thought it was the most diabolical (pardon the phraseology) trash. I'm no christian but that was an absurd interpretation of the life of Jesus that actually left the christian mythology looking more faithful to the historical facts!

      2. Chris Neal profile image84
        Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Ever read "God in the Dock?"

  26. 0
    klarawieckposted 4 years ago

    So, I just finished reading Gerg's first novel Fatal Indemnity. If you haven't congratulated him, then check out this thread and show HP love and support. It's a REALLY good novel and I highly recommend it. If you read his hubs, you'll realize what a great writer he is. http://hubpages.com/forum/topic/99629

  27. Kangaroo_Jase profile image79
    Kangaroo_Jaseposted 4 years ago

    Slowly reading that bio on Steve Jobs. But the book i am looking forward to reading is Magician's End by Raymond E Feist, only problem is its not out until May 2013 sad

  28. connieread profile image80
    conniereadposted 4 years ago

    Just finished On The Road by Kerouac, which was really interesting, especially if you're really into travel. Loved that it was based on his real escapades with his friend Neal Cassidy.

    Right now I'm reading The Cider House Rules by John Irving; it's a bit hefty, but the story-telling is immensely good, really pulls you in!

  29. Caseyjoe870 profile image59
    Caseyjoe870posted 4 years ago

    I have most of fall of giants great read. I am into the whole zombie thing now. I am currently reading World War Z and Autumn

  30. AliciaC profile image96
    AliciaCposted 4 years ago

    I got my sister “The Hunger Games” series for her birthday. She loved it, and she’s given the books to me to read. They’re going to be my next reading project. I know that they were written for children (or young adults), but I like reading imaginative children’s books!

    1. Caseyjoe870 profile image59
      Caseyjoe870posted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I read the first one. Loved it! Still got to read the others.

  31. Rafini profile image83
    Rafiniposted 4 years ago

    I've recently read:  "The Help" by Kathryn Stockett, for enjoyment, and "The Leopard" by Guiseppe di Lampedusa for a History class. 

    I really enjoyed "The Leopard" and chose not to return the book at the end of the semester.

  32. 0
    jomineposted 4 years ago

    I wonder why no one mentions Harry potter series or chronicles of narnia nor any classics. Or is it all read?

    1. Chris Neal profile image84
      Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I imagine that most people who were going to read those since the movies came out have done so. Many of us read one or the other before the movies. I loved the Chronicles as a kid.

      1. 0
        whowasposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Yes, I loved the Chronicles as a kid, too (blissfully ignorant of the disguised christian apologetics, which is doubtless an indication of Lewis's genius!) but interestingly Tolkien didn't like them. He shared Lewis's faith but said he didn't like 'analogies'. However, they were both very influential and while I find the Lord of The Rings quite tedious I still love The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe - and what a great title! Boy do I wish I'd thought of that. smile

        1. Chris Neal profile image84
          Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          smile

    2. JC the Nomad profile image60
      JC the Nomadposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I just finished Moby Dick last week. I have to admit it took about a month to get through. Thought provoking, but man, it's tough at times.

      1. 0
        whowasposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I agree that it's a tough one. Melville actually only sold a little over 3,000 copies in his lifetime and he had to self-publish, too. However, it is worth it. You just have to get into the language and settle in to the pace. It's beautiful really.

  33. prettydarkhorse profile image63
    prettydarkhorseposted 4 years ago

    I would like to read a book where there are many "how to's" on it, general know how  like how to boil water in the microwave, stove top under the sun or on the roof and simple maintenance how tos inside the house that uses tools, car maintenance etc...

  34. sugz profile image79
    sugzposted 4 years ago

    hmmm i stopped reading when i started writing.... 16yrs ago.

  35. angela_michelle profile image94
    angela_michelleposted 4 years ago

    I am finally getting into the fad, and realized its a worthwhile one... but I'm reading Hunger Games.... and the Pretty Little Liars series. Yes I always keep two books going at once. Usually very different ones so I can read based on my mood.

  36. Care Bear profile image59
    Care Bearposted 4 years ago

    At the moment, I'm re-reading (once again) the Harry Potter series. I've probably read the first one at least 7 times now. I'd read them all again when a new book was due to come out. And now I'm reading them again!

    Other books I recommend (besides Dave Barry, they're all fiction/fantasy):
    ~Anything by Dave Barry (I've only read "Dave Barry is From Mars and Venus" and "Dave Barry is Not Making This Up," but I'm getting another one)
    ~"The Name of the Wind" and "The Wise Man's Fear" by Patrick Rothfuss (the first two books of a trilogy--the 3rd hasn't come out yet)
    ~The Ranger's Apprentice series by John Flanagan

  37. ptosis profile image79
    ptosisposted 4 years ago

    The Man Without a Face: The Unlikely Rise of Vladimir Putin by Masha Gessen  (2012)

    Damn, This guy is a bloody thug-thief. Check this out:

    "In June 2005, while hosting a group of American businessmen in St Petersburg, Putin pocketed the 124-diamond Super Bowl ring of New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft. He had asked to see it, tried it on, allegedly said, ''I could kill someone with this'', then stuck it in his pocket and left the room abruptly. After a flurry of articles in the US press, Kraft announced a few days later that the ring had been a gift - preventing an uncomfortable situation from spiralling out of control ..... In September 2005, Putin was a guest at New York's Guggenheim Museum. At one point his hosts brought out a conversation piece another Russian guest must have given the museum: a glass replica of a Kalashnikov automatic weapon filled with vodka. The gaudy souvenir costs $300 in Moscow. Putin nodded to one of his bodyguards, who took the glass Kalashnikov and carried it out of the room, leaving the hosts speechless."

    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_WcX70Lcl0RM/TCjVTBO0JdI/AAAAAAAAA68/bMl4SmtTef4/s1600/3754904641_ff21294eaf.jpg

    1. th0ughts profile image60
      th0ughtsposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I think this may be next on my list!!!

  38. schoolgirlforreal profile image76
    schoolgirlforrealposted 4 years ago

    I am reading a very interesting historical book, which kept me up last night, I'm 1/3 done. smile

    1. Reality Bytes profile image93
      Reality Bytesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I enjoy reading history.  One of my current books is "The Power Makers: Steam, Electricity, and the Men Who Invented Modern America" by Maury Klein.

      I am also reading  "Dancing Wu Li Masters: An Overview of the New Physics" by Gary Zukav


      Both books compliment each other.

      1. ptosis profile image79
        ptosisposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Hey I remember that book!

      2. schoolgirlforreal profile image76
        schoolgirlforrealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        sounds good!

      3. Chris Neal profile image84
        Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Is that the same Gary Zukav who used to bliss out on Oprah?

        1. Reality Bytes profile image93
          Reality Bytesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          I am not sure, I found the book in a pile of used books for sale  smile

  39. readytoescape profile image61
    readytoescapeposted 4 years ago

    I’d suggest fellow Authors Carol Wyer or Stephen Hise

    If you are interested in something humorous and lighthearted try Carol’s

    ‘MINI SKIRTS AND LAUGHTER LINES”
      https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/6 … haelNatale

    For something on the SciFi & exciting side try Stephen’s

    ‘UPGRADES’
    https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/2 … haelNatale

    If you are interested in a thriller novel try mine, titled THE SHOPKEEPER.

    All Three books are receiving FIVE STAR ratings from readers and are available in EBook or Paperback. The links above are just one source to obtain them but they have great descriptions of the books written by the Authors and reader reviews. If you are interested in my novel you can find links in my profile

  40. 0
    i4uposted 4 years ago

    Just read "Doomsday Conspiracy" by Sidney Seldon.
    Currently reading "David Copperfield" by Charles Dickens.
    Anticipating to read, "Revolutions 2020" by Chetan Bhagat.
    Other books in mind are "Deception Point" by Dan Brown, "The God Of Small Things" by Aurundathi Roy.
    I must say Books have been a wonderful part in life and sure it will stay so though whatever replacements come about in any manner.

    1. ptosis profile image79
      ptosisposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I rather have a real book than a kindle. But do like audio books so I can listen while walking/hiking/cleaning house.

    2. Denise Handlon profile image89
      Denise Handlonposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I prefer books over kindles myself.

      I love all of Sidney Sheldon's books.  I was sorry when he died!

    3. Chris Neal profile image84
      Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Dickens is always good!

      1. 0
        whowasposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I completely agree! I'm one hundred percent with you on that, Chris!

  41. Denise Handlon profile image89
    Denise Handlonposted 4 years ago

    Just finished: A widow's story, by Joyce Carol Oates-her memoir of her experience following the death of her husband, Ray Smith, after almost 50 yrs of marriage.

    Will soon be reading:  The Immortal story of Henrietta Lacks--it's about the woman whose cells were frozen and used for decades in research projects: the HeLa cells.  Author: Rebecca Skloot

  42. JBrumett profile image60
    JBrumettposted 4 years ago

    Elric of Melnibone:  So far it's a pretty cool read.

  43. rebekahELLE profile image90
    rebekahELLEposted 4 years ago

    I just started The Stone and the Flute/Hans Bemmann. It's a fantasy novel.  I like it so far.   It is like an endless fairytale with the journey more fascinating than the destination..

  44. ptosis profile image79
    ptosisposted 4 years ago

    Mary's Mosaic: The CIA Conspiracy to Murder John F. Kennedy, Mary Pinchot Meyer, and Their Vision for World Peace by Peter Janney 2012

    The author's father was Wistar Janney, who worked for the CIA ...he eventually discovered a role that his own father had to play in the murder.

    So far a very good book (page 21)
    http://i.huffpost.com/gen/573091/thumbs/s-GREYTOWERS-MPM2SMALLER-large.jpg

  45. chef-de-jour profile image91
    chef-de-jourposted 4 years ago

    I've been working my way through Harmonium by Wallace Stevens for about the last 18 years. His first book of poetry, it shook the literary world when it was published, in 1923, and continues to split poetry lovers right down the middle. Why?
    I do read other books but this one is so rich and savoury I can't stop dipping my bread. Prose is so diluted. Poetry holds the essence of language.

  46. GinnyGyakukouka profile image60
    GinnyGyakukoukaposted 4 years ago

    Text field only, can't copy the cover image. Some sites have a button to pull up a picture from file saved to your computer, one of the ways I've done it that's easier than multiple sites, like loading it to image hosting (Photobucket), then getting the HTML for them to read it here as it's frame instead of address. Ugh. My head spins. I still don't know how to use an offline address if image is saved to Windows file like Pictures, you know? So I have to go to Photobucket...more loading pages...anyone hate loading things as much as I do?

    http://i959.photobucket.com/albums/ae77/GinnaTsuki/TheGraveyardBookbyNeilGaiman.jpg

    BAM! Creativity skill point two-thirds full until level...six. Like the devil.

    Neil Gaiman is someone I'd heard positively about the works of and I had to wait a long time before I could find anything by him to read, being lost in some other dom of darkly fuming porous cycles. Really hope the image is showing up right. Sometimes it's that IMG type of code, other times, it's the http. I can take another page load to preview it before submitting, right?

    1. 0
      whowasposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Neil Gaiman is an excellent writer and The Graveyard Book is an absolutely seminal work well worth a read. He has an extraordinary imagination and beautiful, succinct prose style.

    2. th0ughts profile image60
      th0ughtsposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      This is what our soon-to-be 6th grader chose from her summer reading list.  I have read some of it with her and I think it is actually pretty funny!

  47. Dave Mathews profile image61
    Dave Mathewsposted 4 years ago

    I'm reading intensely the Book of Revelation by John from Patmos.

  48. th0ughts profile image60
    th0ughtsposted 4 years ago

    I have most recently been reading, Death: A Life, by George Pendle

    I find this book smart and utterly hysterical!  However, I know some who would find this book highly offensive...those with closed minds and no sense of humor!  ;-)
    http://s2.hubimg.com/u/6914133_f248.jpg

    1. know one profile image60
      know oneposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      The blurb online is excellent. Will add to my list!

      The last book I read by "Death" was The Book Thief (Markus Zusak). Incredible. Plenty of tears. And the odd laugh.

  49. th0ughts profile image60
    th0ughtsposted 4 years ago

    For those who prefer reading series (and not the 50 Shades kind), I LOVE the Outlander series, by Diana Gabaldon.

    I love this so much, because she combines history with a bit of sci-fi.  I have never been a sci-fi person, but this is written so well...
    http://s2.hubimg.com/u/6914173_f248.jpg

  50. ptosis profile image79
    ptosisposted 4 years ago

    A World of Curiosities: Surprising, Interesting, and Downright Unbelievable Facts from Every Nation on the Planet by John Oldale

    I'm calling shenanigans on some of this the pulling of teeth as a marriage gift is from Canada - not the US. & I have a real hard time believing that US tank ops don't like apricot pits (WTF?)

 
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